2022 Swedish general election

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2022 Swedish general election

← 2018 11 September 2022 2026 →

All 349 seats to the Riksdag
175 seats are needed for a majority
Opinion polls
Turnout6,547,625 (84.2%)
Decrease 2.9pp
  First party Second party Third party
 
Magdalena Andersson in 2022 (cropped) (cropped).jpg
Jimmie.widar.jan.2022-04-05.1155553.light (cropped).jpg
EPP Congress - Day 1 (52112626854) (cropped).jpg
Leader Magdalena Andersson Jimmie Åkesson Ulf Kristersson
Party Social Democrats Sweden Democrats Moderate
Leader since 4 November 2021 7 May 2005 1 October 2017
Leader's seat Stockholm County Jönköping Södermanland
Last election 100 seats, 28.3% 62 seats, 17.5% 70 seats, 19.8%
Seats before 100 61 70
Seats won 107 73 68
Seat change Increase 7 Increase 11 Decrease 2
Popular vote 1,964,474 1,330,325 1,237,428
Percentage 30.3% 20.5% 19.1%
Swing Increase 2.0% Increase 3.0% Decrease 0.7%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
 
Nooshi Dadgostar - 42794852001 (cropped) 2.jpg
Annie Lööf, RD Frågestund 210211 (cropped).jpg
Kommundagarna 2018 (41924670372) (cropped).jpg
Leader Nooshi Dadgostar Annie Lööf Ebba Busch
Party Left Centre Christian Democrats
Leader since 31 October 2020 23 September 2011 25 April 2015
Leader's seat Stockholm County Jönköping Västra Götaland East
Last election 28 seats, 8.0% 31 seats, 8.6% 22 seats, 6.3%
Seats before 27 31 22
Seats won 24 24 19
Seat change Decrease 4 Decrease 7 Decrease 3
Popular vote 437,050 434,945 345,712
Percentage 6.8% 6.7% 5.3%
Swing Decrease 1.3% Decrease 1.9% Decrease 1.0%

  Seventh party Eighth party
 
Swedish Green Leadership as of 2021.jpg
Johan Pehrson 2022 Stockholm 04 (cropped) 2.jpg
Leader Märta Stenevi
Per Bolund
Johan Pehrson
Party Green Liberals
Leader since 31 January 2021
4 May 2019
8 April 2022
Leader's seat Stockholm County
Stockholm
Örebro
Last election 16 seats, 4.4% 20 seats, 5.5%
Seats before 16 20
Seats won 18 16
Seat change Increase 2 Decrease 4
Popular vote 329,242 298,542
Percentage 5.1% 4.6%
Swing Increase 0.7% Decrease 0.9%

Swedish General Election 2022.svg
Riksdagsvalet 2022.svg

Prime Minister before election

Magdalena Andersson
Social Democrats

Prime Minister after election

TBD

General elections were held in Sweden on 11 September 2022 to elect the 349 members of the Riksdag. They in turn will elect the prime minister of Sweden. Under the constitution, regional and municipal elections were also held on the same day. The preliminary results presented on 15 September 2022 showed the government parties lost their majority, which were confirmed by the final results published on 17 September 2022. The likely outcome of the election is that Ulf Kristersson, the leader of the Moderate Party (M), will become prime minister.

Following the 2018 Swedish general election, the Swedish Social Democratic Party (S) under Stefan Löfven formed a government with the Green Party (MP), while the Centre Party (C), Left Party (V), and Liberals (L) abstained during the vote of confidence on 18 January 2019. The Alliance, in which C and L had participated since 2004, was effectively dissolved; by late 2021, an informal right-wing alliance was formed by M with Kristersson as prime ministerial candidate of a government including the Christian Democrats (KD) with the support of L and the Sweden Democrats (SD). Löfven governed throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden, even as his government was briefly dismissed due to a no-confidence vote initiated by V in June 2021 over rent controls. Löfven resigned from all political offices in November 2021. Magdalena Andersson, Sweden's former Minister for Finance, succeeded him and led the Andersson Cabinet since then, with C, V, and MP serving as confidence and supply for the government.

The campaign period was met with issues regarding the accession of Sweden to NATO due to the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, as well as crime, energy, economy, and immigration. Parliamentary parties campaigned through July and August, while in late August SD surpassed M in opinion polls. Exit polls showed that S and confidence and supply parties had a tight lead against the right-leaning bloc (SD, M, KD, L). During the counting of the preliminary results and later on, Sweden's Election Authority said that the right-leaning bloc overtook the left-leaning bloc (S, V, C, MP) by three seats. Andersson conceded the election three days later, followed by her resignation the next day.

The election saw massive swings between the two blocs in different regions. The left-leaning bloc won the most votes in large cities and several university towns with unprecedented massive margins. This included major relative gains across the capital region and also flipping two suburban municipalities in Stockholm County. Meanwhile, the right managed to overturn dozens of municipalities that had historically been dominated by S, especially in the central interior Bergslagen region. In this historically industrial area, Dalarna County was won by the right-leaning coalition for the first time in history. This also applied to some municipalities the outright leftist parties (S, V, MP) had won with 50 points overall majority in the 1994 Swedish general election.

Major gains in minority were also made by the right-leaning bloc in northern Sweden, leading the vote in eight municipalities compared to none four years prior. In the lower east, the historically leftist swing counties Kalmar, Södermanland, Västmanland, and Östergötland all went to the right to seal the majority. S won 30% of the popular vote with a net increase in spite of the election loss. SD became the second largest party with above 20% of the popular vote, surpassing M at 19%. The blocs were separated by a thin margin of about half a percentage point. The parties aligned with the outgoing government did somewhat better in the regional and municipal elections.

Background

The Swedish Social Democratic Party (S) came back to power after the 2014 Swedish general election, with the Green Party (MP) taking part in Stefan Löfven's coalition government.[1] S retained the position as the largest parliamentary party after the 2018 general election, despite losing 13 seats in comparison with the previous election.[2] The election resulted in a hung parliament, as neither the Red-Greens nor the Alliance had enough seats to form a government, and the Sweden Democrats (SD), which had been subject to a cordon sanitaire by all other parties as an anti-immigration or far-right party, won 62 seats.[3][4]

Ulf Kristersson, the leader of the Moderate Party (M), was given the task of forming the government and opened up to SD after previously ruling out an alliance with them upon assuming the party leadership in 2017 and during the 2018 election campaign. In turn, the Centre Party (C) and Liberals (L) declined to back his candidacy, as Kristersson wanted SD to take part in the government.[5][6][7] Löfven was later given the task, although he also failed to form a government.[8] Speaker of the Riksdag, Andreas Norlén, set another vote to be held in January, and Löfven formed a deal between S, MP, C, L, and the Left Party (V). Löfven was re-elected on 18 January 2019 with S and MP voting in favor, while C, L, and V abstained.[9]

Löfven's government

The first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Sweden became known on 31 January 2020. The government later ordered 100,000 people a week to be tested in order to curb the spread of the disease; with insufficient healthcare resources and unclear responsibilities, the goal was not met. In contrast to the World Health Organization, the government did not recommend the use of face masks during the COVID-19 pandemic.[10] During the COVID-19 pandemic, the government did not impose national lockdowns but rather limits on the number of people that are allowed to meet at public places.[11] In December 2019, Kristersson held a meeting with SD leader Jimmie Åkesson, and said that he would cooperate with them in the Riksdag. According to Ann-Cathrine Jungar of Södertörn University, this put Sweden in line with several other European countries in which centre-right and radical-right parties cooperate.[12] In August 2020, the right-wing opposition criticised the Löfven government for a perceived failure to deal with rising crime including gun violence, which Kristersson called a "second pandemic".[13]

During his premiership, Löfven abolished the austerity tax (Värnskatten),[14] a top tax rate of 5% points for incomes above €6,000 a month, as was requested by the then Liberals leader Jan Björklund in turn for allowing his premiership.[15] V opposed this move and later also stated it would initiate a vote of no confidence due to the government's policies the party saw as "unacceptable".[16] In 2021, S proposed to abolish rent controls for new housing; V responded by initiating a vote of no confidence against the government.[17][18] Löfven's government was dismissed on 21 June 2021; only S and MP voted in favor of his government.[19] After the dismissal, Nyamko Sabuni, the new leader of the Liberals, stated that her party would not cooperate with S anymore.[20] Speaker Norlén proposed Löfven to form a government, and on 7 July the government was re-established.[21][22] A month later, Löfven announced that he would step down as leader of S and as prime minister in autumn of 2021.[23] Following the dissappointing results in the 2018 general election that once again relegated the party to the opposition and saw the dismissal of the centre-right Alliance, M broke the cordon sanitaire in Swedish politics and opened up to SD. By autumn 2021, the right-wing opposition (M, SD, KD, L) formed an informal agreement for a future M–KD government headed by Kristersson of the Moderate Party as prime minister with the external support of L and SD.[24][25]

Andersson's government

The Social Democrats held a party congress on 4 November 2021, in order to elect a new leader; former Minister for Finance, Magdalena Andersson, succeeded Löfven as the leader of the party.[26] Speaker Norlén proposed Andersson to form a government, and after securing a deal with V, Andersson was elected as prime minister on 24 November.[27][28] MP pulled out of confidence and supply for her government, which led to Andersson's resignation seven hours after her election as prime minister.[29][30][31] MP quit the government due to the passage of the opposition's budget in place of that of the government.[32]

Speaker Norlén nominated Andersson again, and on 29 November she was re-elected with 101 votes in favor and 75 abstentions.[33][34][35] Considering that MP did not vote in favor of the government, the Andersson Cabinet would be only composed of members of S.[36] Heading into the 2022 general election, Andersson's leadership moved the Social Democrats to the left after the publication of a May 2021 party report, "Distributional Policies for Equality and Fairness", which criticised the rising inequalities that emerged from political decisions by previous left and right governments.[37]

Following the beginning of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, Andersson's government applied with Finland to join NATO on 18 May 2022, despite the historical opposition of Social Democrats to NATO.[38][39] During the vote in the Riksdag, only MP and V voted against joining NATO.[40] In July, the government signed the accession protocol in order to join NATO.[41] Andersson's government received high approval ratings.[42]

Electoral system

The Riksdag is made up of 349 seats, and all are elected through open list, proportional representation on multi-member party lists.[43] Sweden has the distinction of having elections on a fixed date with a parliamentary system in which early elections can be called. In the latter case, the newly-elected legislature would serve the remainder of the four-year term begun by the previous legislature. Elections are organized on the second Sunday of September every four years, at the same time as the municipal and regional elections.[44][45][46]

Each of the 29 constituencies has a set number of parliamentarians that is divided through constituency results to ensure regional representation. The other members of parliament (MPs) are then elected through a proportional balancing, to ensure that the numbers of elected MPs for the various parties accurately represent the votes of the electorate. The Swedish constitution (Regeringsformen) 1 Ch. 4 § says that the Riksdag is responsible for taxation and making laws, and 1 Ch. 6 § says that the government is held responsible to the Riksdag. This means that Sweden has parliamentarism in a constitutional monarchy—ensuring that the government is responsible to the people's representatives. A minimum of 4% of the national vote, or alternatively 12% or more within a constituency, is required for a party to enter the Riksdag. Were the latter to occur, the party only gains representation within that constituency's seat share. Of the 349 seats, 310 are elected within the 29 constituencies. The remainder are apportioned nationally as leveling seats to ensure a proportional result. Were a party to win more constituencies than it is entitled to overall, a redistribution of constituency seats may occur to reduce the number of constituency seats won by that party.[47]

In Swedish elections, voters may openly pick up several party-specific ballots, and then, in the voting booth, mark the ballot they chose. Two election observers of the OSCE present at the 2018 general election criticized this system, saying that it could endanger ballot secrecy, and that they would look into the issue in the report that was to be published eight weeks later.[48] Election officials are responsible for party-specific ballot papers being present in the voting places for parties that have obtained more than one percent of the votes in the previous parliamentary election.[49] A voter may write in the party name of choice on a blank ballot paper to cast a vote if there is no access to the desired party-specific ballot paper.[50]

Political parties

The table below lists political parties represented in the Riksdag after the 2018 general election.

Name Ideology Political position Leader 2018 result
Votes (%) Seats
Swedish Social Democratic Party Social democracy Centre-left Magdalena Andersson 28.26%
100 / 349
Moderate Party Liberal conservatism Centre-right Ulf Kristersson 19.84%
70 / 349
Sweden Democrats Right-wing populism Right-wing to far-right Jimmie Åkesson 17.53%
62 / 349
Centre Party Liberalism Centre to centre-right Annie Lööf 8.61%
31 / 349
Left Party Socialism Left-wing to far-left Nooshi Dadgostar 8.00%
28 / 349
Christian Democrats Christian democracy Centre-right to right-wing Ebba Busch 6.32%
22 / 349
Liberals Liberalism Centre-right Johan Pehrson 5.49%
20 / 349
Green Party Green politics Centre-left Märta Stenevi
Per Bolund
4.41%
16 / 349

Pre-election composition

Composition of Riksdag shortly before the 2022 Swedish general election
Party Seats
Swedish Social Democratic Party 100
Moderate Party 70
Sweden Democrats 61
Centre Party 31
Left Party 27
Christian Democrats 22
Liberals 20
Green Party 16
Independents 2

Campaign

Issues

Political parties campaigning in Uppsala on 11 August 2022
Political parties campaigning in Uppsala

After the beginning of the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine, campaign issues shifted towards the NATO accession of Sweden, as well as the neighboring Finland. A militarily non-aligned country,[51] opinion polls after the invasion had showed that a majority of respondents supported the accession of Sweden into NATO for the first time.[52] The Swedish Social Democratic Party (S) and Sweden Democrats (SD), who had historically favored neutrality, revised their stance on the issue and stated their support for joining NATO.[39][53] The Green Party (MP) remained opposed, while the Left Party (V) stated that they would opt for a referendum on the subject.[54][55]

Crime was a key campaign issue.[56][57][58] Issues regarding immigration also played a key role during the campaign period,[59] and issues related to gang crime were talked about the most.[60] Additionally, issues regarding energy, healthcare, law and order, education, economy, and environment were also talked about during the campaign period.[61][62][63]

Party campaigns

The Social Democrats published their election manifesto, in which the party had promised to tackle issues regarding crime, welfare, climate, green industry, and rising prices.[64] It had also called for automatic preschool for three-year-old children.[65] During their campaign, the Social Democrats voiced support for nuclear power.[66] Andersson criticized the Moderate Party's proposal regarding property tax warnings.[67] The Moderate Party stated that it would want to reduce immigration to "same levels as Denmark and Norway". Additionally, it would want to make asylums laws more restrictive and to abolish the "track change system", which allows rejected asylum seekers to apply for work permits.[68] Kristersson proposed that the state should set a price threshold for energy bills.[69] The Sweden Democrats campaigned on lowering the asylum migration "close to zero", as well as introducing longer prison sentences.[70][71] Åkesson also stated his support for stricter work permits.[72] In August, the Sweden Democrats surged in opinion polls due to their tough stance on crime and immigration, surpassing the Moderate Party.[60][73][74]

In August, Lööf stated that she would want the Centre Party (C) to be part of a Social Democrat-led government (S, C, V, MP).[75] Lööf was later a target of attack by a former member of the Nordic Resistance Movement, a neo-Nazi political party.[61] During the election campaign, the Left Party campaigned on "taking back control over welfare" and climate issues. Dadgostar stated her support for investing in green technology and infrastructure, and also criticized the parties on the right.[76] She also stated that the Left Party would work with parties on the left to form a government.[77] The Christian Democrats (KD) campaigned on installing more security cameras and increasing funding in resources for the police in order to fight gang crime. Busch called for the re-opening of Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant, as well as expanding the water and wind production.[76] The Liberals (L) stated their support for more investments into solar, wind, and nuclear power. Additionally, the Liberals stated that they would want to lower taxes on electricity, especially VAT and excise taxes.[76] In August 2022, there was an internal conflict among the Liberals regarding campaigning on a bus tour that would have included SD.[78] Pehrson responded by stating that the four parties (M, SD, KD, L) would visit a nuclear power plant together, and described it as "hardly a big ideological question". There was also internal criticism regarding cooperating with SD on the budget.[79] The Green Party campaigned on climate and social issues, including investment and expansion of rail/train transport in Sweden, and replacing fossil fuels and diesel with renewable fuels, as well as protecting free media and initiating a citizenship initiative system to allow in part for legislation proposed by citizens.[76]

Slogans

Political campaign posters in Västervik, Kalmar County
Party Original slogan English translation
Swedish Social Democratic Party Tillsammans kan vi göra vårt Sverige bättre Together we can make our Sweden better
Moderate Party Nu får vi ordning på Sverige Let's get Sweden in order
Sweden Democrats Sverige ska bli bra igen... och inget snack Sweden will be good again... and no empty words
Centre Party För Sveriges bästa For the good of Sweden
Left Party Andra lovar, vi agerar Others promise, we act
Christian Democrats Redo att göra Sverige tryggare Ready to make Sweden safer
Liberals Utan oss inget maktskifte Without us, no change of power
Green Party Alla ska med när Sverige ställer om Everyone will join when Sweden transitions
Sources:[80][81][82]

Debates

2022 Swedish general election debates
Date Time Organizers     P  Present    I  Invitee   N  Non-invitee 
S M SD C V KD L MP Refs
16 Aug 20:00 Expressen P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
P
Jimmie Åkesson
P
Annie Lööf
P
Nooshi Dadgostar
P
Ebba Busch
P
Johan Pehrson
P
Märta Stenevi
[83]
17 Aug 21:00 Aftonbladet P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
P
Jimmie Åkesson
P
Annie Lööf
P
Nooshi Dadgostar
P
Ebba Busch
P
Johan Pehrson
P
Märta Stenevi
[84]
31 Aug 11:45 Sveriges Radio P
Hans Dahlgren
P
Tobias Billström
P
Markus Wiechel
P
Martin Ådahl [sv]
P
Ali Esbati
P
Jakob Forssmed [sv]
P
Maria Nilsson
P
Maria Ferm
[85]
2 Sep 15:00 Sveriges Radio P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
P
Jimmie Åkesson
P
Annie Lööf
P
Nooshi Dadgostar
P
Ebba Busch
P
Johan Pehrson
P
Märta Stenevi
[86]
7 Sep 20:00 SVT P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
N N N N N N [87]
8 Sep 20:00 TV4 P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
P
Jimmie Åkesson
P
Annie Lööf
P
Nooshi Dadgostar
P
Ebba Busch
P
Johan Pehrson
P
Märta Stenevi
[88]
9 Sep 20:00 SVT P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
P
Jimmie Åkesson
P
Annie Lööf
P
Nooshi Dadgostar
P
Ebba Busch
P
Johan Pehrson
P
Märta Stenevi
[89]
10 Sep 20:00 TV4 P
Magdalena Andersson
P
Ulf Kristersson
N N N N N N [90]

Opinion polls

Results

As of 15 September 2022, the results remained preliminary after a first tally was presented.[91][92] The official results were announced about a week after the election, showing very minor changes.[93][94]

PartyVotes%Seats+/–
Swedish Social Democratic Party1,964,47430.33107+7
Sweden Democrats1,330,32520.5473+11
Moderate Party1,237,42819.1068−2
Left Party437,0506.7524−4
Centre Party434,9456.7124−7
Christian Democrats345,7125.3419−3
Green Party329,2425.0818+2
Liberals298,5424.6116−4
Nuance Party28,3520.440New
Alternative for Sweden16,6460.2600
Citizens' Coalition12,8820.2000
Pirate Party9,1350.1400
Humanist Democracy6,0770.090New
Christian Values Party5,9830.0900
Knapptryckarna5,4930.080New
Feminist Initiative3,1570.0500
Independent Rural Party2,2150.0300
Direct Democrats1,7550.0300
Climate Alliance1,7020.030New
Unity1,2340.0200
Communist Party of Sweden1,1810.0200
64 other parties (fewer than 1,000 votes)4,2640.07
Total6,477,794100.003490
Valid votes6,477,79498.93
Invalid/blank votes69,8311.07
Total votes6,547,625100.00
Registered voters/turnout7,775,39084.21
Source: Sweden's Election Authority[95]
Alliance Votes % Seats +/−
Kristersson's Bloc (M+SD+KD+L) 3,212,007 49.59 176 +2
Andersson's Bloc (S+MP+V+C) 3,165,711 48.87 173 −2
Other parties 100,076 1.54
Invalid/blank votes 69,831
Total 6,547,625 100 349 0
Registered voters/turnout 7,495,936 87.18
Source: VAL

Voter demographics

Sveriges Television exit polling (VALU) suggested the following demographic breakdown based on preliminary results to the nearest integer.

Cohort Percentage of cohort voting for Lead
S SD M V C KD MP L Others
Total vote 30 21 19 7 7 5 5 5 1 9
Gender
Females 34 16 17 8 8 6 6 4 1 17
Males 26 25 21 6 6 5 4 5 2 1
Age
18–21 years old 20 22 26 10 6 5 5 5 1 4
22–30 years old 23 17 21 11 8 6 6 5 3 2
31–64 years old 30 21 19 6 6 6 5 4 3 9
65 years old and older 38 17 16 4 7 5 4 6 3 21
Work
Blue-collar workers 32 29 14 9 4 5 4 2 1 3
White-collar workers 32 15 21 6 8 5 6 6 0 11
Entrepreneurs and farmers 19 24 25 3 9 6 6 6 2 1
Source: Sveriges Television[96]

Result by constituency

Constituency Land Turnout Share Votes S SD M V C KD MP L Other Left Right Majority
% % % % % % % % % % % % %
Blekinge G 86.1 1.6 103,580 31.1 28.5 17.9 4.4 4.8 5.5 2.9 3.5 1.2 43.3 55.4 12,544
Dalarna S 85.4 2.9 186,598 31.7 25.7 16.4 5.3 6.5 6.0 3.8 3.1 1.5 47.3 51.2 7,377
Gothenburg G 80.7 5.4 347,101 27.7 14.7 18.5 12.8 5.9 4.4 7.9 5.9 2.3 54.3 43.4 37,877
Gotland G 87.1 0.6 41,459 34.6 15.7 16.8 6.4 11.7 4.0 6.5 2.8 1.5 59.2 39.3 8,257
Gävleborg N 83.5 2.8 182,587 34.7 24.1 16.2 5.9 6.2 5.1 3.5 3.0 1.2 50.3 48.4 3,491
Halland G 86.6 3.4 221,675 28.3 22.6 22.5 4.0 7.0 6.0 3.6 4.8 1.1 42.9 55.9 28,741
Jämtland N 85.0 1.3 85,024 36.1 20.1 14.8 5.6 9.1 5.4 5.0 2.6 1.3 55.8 42.9 10,966
Jönköping G 85.3 3.5 229,125 29.1 23.3 18.7 4.0 7.5 9.3 3.2 3.7 1.3 43.7 55.0 25,965
Kalmar G 86.0 2.5 161,267 31.7 24.5 17.8 4.6 6.5 7.0 3.4 3.2 1.3 46.3 52.4 9,927
Kronoberg G 85.4 1.9 124,992 31.0 23.6 19.5 5.0 6.0 6.8 3.5 3.1 1.5 45.5 53.0 9,364
Malmö G 77.2 3.0 192,043 29.6 16.4 17.9 12.5 5.5 3.0 7.5 4.5 3.2 55.0 41.8 25,502
Norrbotten N 84.6 2.5 161,455 41.6 20.3 13.6 7.0 5.3 5.1 3.4 2.5 1.1 57.4 41.5 25,549
Skåne NE G 83.9 3.1 202,890 25.2 32.2 19.5 3.9 4.9 6.2 3.0 3.8 1.3 37.1 61.6 49,858
Skåne S G 87.3 4.0 259,333 25.4 23.4 22.1 5.0 6.6 4.8 5.5 6.2 1.2 42.5 56.3 35,918
Skåne W G 81.9 3.0 191,655 27.3 28.8 19.8 4.6 5.0 4.7 3.5 4.5 1.8 40.5 57.8 33,196
Stockholm S 84.0 9.4 606,751 28.1 10.7 19.1 11.7 8.5 3.2 10.0 6.9 1.9 58.3 39.9 112,381
Stockholm County S 82.5 12.7 822,510 27.1 17.5 24.0 6.3 7.4 4.9 5.1 6.0 1.7 45.9 52.4 53,198
Södermanland S 83.5 2.9 184,880 32.9 23.0 19.2 5.2 5.9 4.7 4.0 3.6 1.4 48.1 50.5 4,581
Uppsala S 86.0 3.8 248,888 29.1 18.2 18.3 7.9 7.2 5.9 6.7 5.0 1.7 51.0 47.4 8,907
Värmland S 85.2 2.8 182,231 34.6 22.8 17.0 5.0 6.3 5.8 3.6 3.7 1.0 49.6 49.4 373
Västerbotten N 85.8 2.7 177,543 40.7 14.5 14.1 8.5 7.8 4.7 5.4 3.1 1.1 62.5 36.4 46,196
Västernorrland N 85.2 2.5 158,721 39.4 20.7 14.0 5.7 7.4 5.4 3.4 2.7 1.2 56.0 42.8 21,000
Västmanland S 82.9 2.6 170,749 32.0 23.7 19.1 6.1 5.4 5.0 3.2 4.2 1.3 46.7 52.0 8,931
Västra Götaland E G 86.1 2.7 176,526 31.4 24.1 18.6 4.5 6.6 7.0 3.3 3.4 1.3 45.7 53.0 12,878
Västra Götaland N G 84.4 2.7 173,655 31.3 25.4 17.5 5.2 5.7 6.2 3.6 3.6 1.5 45.8 52.8 12,110
Västra Götaland S G 84.4 2.2 141,906 29.1 23.6 18.9 5.3 7.1 7.0 3.6 3.8 1.6 45.1 53.3 11,590
Västra Götaland W G 87.6 3.8 247,863 28.0 21.2 20.5 5.7 6.4 6.3 5.2 5.4 1.3 45.3 53.4 20,019
Örebro S 84.7 3.0 194,187 33.2 22.1 16.7 6.1 6.3 5.3 4.1 4.5 1.6 49.7 48.7 1,855
Östergötland G 85.3 4.6 300,600 30.6 21.2 19.8 5.6 6.5 6.0 4.6 4.4 1.3 47.3 51.4 12,453
Total 84.2 100.0 6,477,794 30.3 20.5 19.1 6.8 6.7 5.3 5.1 4.6 1.5 48.8 49.5 46,296
Source: Sweden's Election Authority[95]

Seat distribution

Constituency S SD M V C KD MP L Left Right Total
Blekinge 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 3 5
Dalarna 3 3 2 1 1 1 0 0 5 6 11
Gävleborg 4 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 6 5 11
Gothenburg 5 3 3 2 1 1 2 1 10 8 18
Gotland 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2
Halland 3 3 2 0 1 1 1 1 5 7 12
Jämtland 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 4
Jönköping 4 3 2 1 1 1 0 1 6 7 13
Kalmar 3 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 5 8
Kronoberg 2 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 2 4 6
Malmö 3 2 2 1 1 0 1 1 6 5 11
Norrbotten 4 2 1 1 0 0 0 0 5 3 8
Skåne NE 3 4 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 10
Skåne S 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 6 8 14
Skåne W 3 3 2 0 1 0 0 1 4 6 10
Södermanland 4 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 7 4 11
Stockholm 9 4 6 4 3 1 4 3 20 14 34
Stockholm County 11 8 10 3 3 2 3 3 20 23 43
Uppsala 4 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 7 6 13
Värmland 4 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 6 5 11
Västerbotten 4 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 7 2 9
Västernorrland 4 2 1 1 1 0 0 0 6 3 9
Västmanland 3 2 2 1 0 0 0 0 4 4 8
Västra Götaland E 3 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 4 5 9
Västra Götaland N 3 2 2 0 0 1 0 0 3 5 8
Västra Götaland S 2 2 2 0 1 1 0 0 3 5 8
Västra Götaland W 3 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 6 8 14
Örebro 3 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 6 6 12
Östergötland 5 4 3 1 1 1 1 1 8 9 17
Total 107 73 68 24 24 19 18 16 173 176 349
Source: Sweden's Election Authority[95]

Maps

  • Map of the 2022 Swedish general election shaded by party strength

    Map of the 2022 Swedish general election shaded by party strength

  • Map of the 2022 Swedish general election shaded by coalition strength

    Map of the 2022 Swedish general election shaded by coalition strength

  • Coalition results, red (S, V, C, MP) to blue (SD, M, KD, L), shaded by strength

    Coalition results, red (S, V, C, MP) to blue (SD, M, KD, L), shaded by strength

  • Map results for the Swedish Social Democratic Party (S)

    Map results for the Swedish Social Democratic Party (S)

  • Map results for the Sweden Democrats (SD)

    Map results for the Sweden Democrats (SD)

  • Map results for the Moderate Party (M)

    Map results for the Moderate Party (M)

  • Map results for the Left Party (V)

    Map results for the Left Party (V)

  • Map results for the Centre Party (C)

    Map results for the Centre Party (C)

  • Map results for the Christian Democrats (KD)

    Map results for the Christian Democrats (KD)

  • Map results for the Green Party (MP)

    Map results for the Green Party (MP)

  • Map results for the Liberals (L)

    Map results for the Liberals (L)

Aftermath

Voting stations were opened from 08:00 (CEST) to 20:00, and there were 7,772,120 Swedish nationals in total that had the right to vote in the 2022 general election.[97][98] According to exit polls that were published by Sveriges Television and TV4, the bloc around the Swedish Social Democratic Party (S) showed a tight lead against the bloc around the Moderate Party (M).[99][100] It was also reported that the Sweden Democrats (SD) surpassed M in the amount of votes, and suggested that it could become the second-largest parliamentary party.[101] S also won more votes in comparison with the 2018 Swedish general election.[102]

Sweden's Election Authority stated that the bloc that composed of M, SD, Christian Democrats (KD), and Liberals (L) overtook the bloc around S by one to three seats during the counting of the preliminary results.[103] The gap between the two blocs was around 50,000 votes.[104] Ulf Kristersson, the M leader, stated that "the results would be likely known by Wednesday" and he thanked his voters, while Jimmie Åkesson, the SD leader, stated that SD would play a "central role" in the power shift.[105] Kristersson also said that a change in the numbers of seats is possible.[106] As overseas and some postal votes were to be counted, the incumbent prime minister Magdalena Andersson stated that "it is too close to call the election".[107] Some analysts have seen the rise of the Nuance Party, mainly aimed at the country's Muslim population, as one of the causes of the losses in the left bloc.[108]

SD's election night vigil in Stockholm attracted controversy after the party refused to grant access to several foreign language media and after the party's chief of staff Linus Bylund joked that he was looking forward to "journalist rugby", where "you push journalists around". The election vigil also attracted controversy after an SD candidate for the Stockholm municipal election proclaimed "Helg Seger" while raising her arm in an interview with far-right blog Samnytt, which is phonetically similar to "Hell Seger", the Swedish translation of the Nazi "Sieg Heil" chant. The candidate subsequently told Expressen that she had aimed to provoke the media into overinterpretations before later telling Dagens Nyheter that she had misspoke and meant to say "segerhelg", which would translate to "victory weekend".[109]

On 13 September, Annie Lööf, the leader of the Centre Party (C), sent an internal email to the party's elected politicians in which she called the results for the party "very disappointing" and stated that C's board would conduct an investigation into the party's campaign.[110] Two days later, Lööf announced her resignation as party leader.[111][112] Andersson conceded on 14 September,[113] and announced her resignation as prime minister,[114][115] paving the way for Kristersson to attempt to form a new government. Andersson called upon M, KD, and L to reject SD, and said she was open to a government with M that would exclude SD.[116] Some Liberals in particular have been wary of a government with SD.[117] Renew Europe, the European parliamentary group of which L is part, has been critical of the Liberals being part of a government including SD.[118]

Despite the right-wing majority, no government had been formed by the opening of the newly-elected Riksdag on 26 September. Moderate Party leaders raised concerns that SD would hold a disproportionate amount of influence over a new government, and would use the committee chairmanships allocated to them to block or delay government policy.[119][120] On 26 September, Andreas Norlén of the Moderate Party was re-elected as Speaker of the Riksdag by acclamation. The election of Julia Kronlid of the Sweden Democrats as Second Deputy Speaker of the Riksdag required a second ballot after the first ballot fell three votes short of the required majority.[121][122][123]

See also

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