2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup final

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup final
The Germany national team celebrating winning the World Cup.
Event2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup
Germany Serbia
83 77
1234 Total
Germany 23242214 83
Serbia 26211020 77
Date10 September 2023
Venue
Man of the Match
Franz Wagner (Germany)
Referees
  • Roberto Vázquez (Puerto Rico)
  • Omar Bermúdez (Mexico)
  • Gatis Saliņš (Latvia)
Attendance12,022
← 2019
2027 →

The 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup final was the concluding basketball game which determined the winner of the 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup. The game was played on 10 September 2023, at the Mall of Asia Arena, in Pasay, Metro Manila, Philippines,[1] between Germany and Serbia. It was the first all-European final since 2006 in Japan,[2] when Spain won its first title against Greece.[3]

At halftime, a turnover ceremony was held to officially hand over the hosting rights of the FIBA Basketball World Cup from the Philippines, Japan, and Indonesia to Qatar, host of the 2027 FIBA Basketball World Cup,[4] the first in tournament history to be held in the Middle East and North Africa region.[5] The Naismith Trophy was awarded to the winning team for the second time since the adoption of its new version in 2017,[6] with Germany winning its first World Cup title.[7]

Background

The 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup was the 19th edition of the tournament, held in multiple countries for the first time in its history in the Philippines, Japan, and Indonesia,[8] between 25 August and 10 September 2023.[9] Japan and the Philippines automatically qualified as hosts but Indonesia weren't able to qualify after failing to reach the quarterfinals of the 2022 FIBA Asia Cup, which was the condition set by FIBA for the country to qualify for the tournament.[10][11] 80 teams competed for the remaining 30 spots through qualification windows organized by FIBA's four confederations (Africa, Americas, Asia-Oceania, Europe) and were held from November 2021 to February 2023.[12][13] In the final draw, the 32 qualified teams were then divided into eight groups of four teams, with each team playing each other once in a round-robin format.[14] The top two teams in each group qualified for the second round made up of the teams that advanced from the first round, with groups being formed by joining pairs of first-round groups together (A and B to I, C and D to J, E and F to K, and G and H to L). The top two teams from each group advanced to a knock-out phase.[15][16]

The defending champions from the 2019 World Cup were Spain. They managed to top their first round group but were eliminated in the second round,[17] finishing at third behind Canada and Latvia.[18] Both Germany and Serbia have not won the FIBA Basketball World Cup once, but the latter cliched two consecutive titles in 1998 and 2002, respectively, as the former Yugoslavia.[19] Germany won its last matchup against Serbia at the World Cup in 2010 in double-overtime, 82–81.[20]

Serbia reached the 2014 final and the 2016 Olympic final, but lost to the United States on both occasions.[21][22] They were also eliminated by Argentina in the quarter-finals of the 2019 tournament.[23] Under head coach Svetislav Pešić, Serbia won all of its five games in the group phase and finished 9th at the EuroBasket 2022.[24][25] The 2023 final would be the first for Germany[19] in their seventh World Cup appearance and sixth as Germany, as they were formerly known as West Germany in their tournament debut in 1986.[26] Their previous best performance was at the 2002 World Cup, where they won the bronze medal after winning against New Zealand in the third-place game.[27] Under head coach Gordon Herbert, Germany also won the bronze at the EuroBasket 2022,[28] the country's first podium finish in the tournament since 2005.[19]

Venue

The SM Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay hosted the match

The final was played at the

Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay, a city within Metro Manila, Philippines. The arena was one of the five proposed venues of the joint Philippine–Japanese–Indonesian World Cup bid, and was named the Final Phase venue on 28 April 2023.[1] It hosted twelve group stage games, four second-round games, four 17–32 classification games, and all final phase games.[29]

The Mall of Asia Arena, owned by SM Lifestyle Entertainment, which is under

The arena is one of the playing venues of the

Venue change

The Philippine Arena was initially set to host the tournament's final phase.

The joint bid initially called for the 55,000-seater

opening ceremony of the 2019 Southeast Asian Games.[51]

On 28 April 2023, FIBA announced during its Central Board meeting that the venue would be changed to the Mall of Asia Arena in Pasay, citing logistical and transport issues, which were experienced in various events at the arena, including various concerts and the sixth and final window of the 2023 World Cup Asian Qualifiers.[52] Instead, the Philippine Arena hosted the first two games of Group A on 25 August 2023: Angola vs. Italy and Dominican Republic vs. Philippines.[1][53]

Route to the final

Note: In all results below, the score of the finalist is given first.

 Germany Round  Serbia
Opponent Result Opponent Result
 Japan 81–63 Game 1  China 105–63
 Australia 85–82 Game 2  Puerto Rico 94–77
 Finland 101–75 Game 3  South Sudan 115–83
 Georgia 100–73 Game 4  Italy 76–78
 Slovenia 100–71 Game 5  Dominican Republic 112–79
 Latvia 81–79 Quarter-finals  Lithuania 87–68
United States 113–111 Semi-finals  Canada 95–86

Game

The game between Germany and Serbia was widely seen as a surprising final, as both teams were not favoured in their semi-final match-ups. In FIBA's media survey, none of the participants tipped Germany or Serbia as title winners, instead favouring record holders United States.[54] The game was tightly contested in the first quarter, which finished with a 23–26 score. Serbia went on a run in the second quarter, and following a Bogdan Bogdanović step-back three-pointer the Serbs led by four points, 38–42. Germany managed to come back and the two teams went into halftime with the score tied at 47–47. It was only the second time a World Cup final had been tied at halftime.[55] In the third quarter, Germany opened up a lead after going on a 15–4 run and began the final quarter with a 12-point lead. Serbia fought back, behind 13 points in the quarter from Aleksa Avramović. With 1:21 remaining and just a three-point lead, Germany's Isaac Bonga turned over the ball to Marko Gudurić, who missed a lay-up as he was fouled in the process. Following more free throws by Germany and Serbia, the game was 79–77, Germany, in the final minute. With just 21 seconds on the clock, it was Dennis Schröder driving lay-up that gave the Germans an 81–77 lead. In the following possession, Gudurić turned the ball over and Schröder converted two free-throws to seal Germany's first-ever World Cup title. Schröder had a game-high 28 points and hit nine of his seventeen attempted field goals. Franz Wagner contributed 19 points and 7 rebounds, while Avramović led Serbia in scoring with 21 points.[55] Bogdanović finished with 17 points and 5 assists. Schröder was named the tournament's most valuable player after the game,[55] and was also named to the All-Star Five along with Bogdanović.[56]


10 September 2023
20:40
Germany  83–77 Serbia
Scoring by quarter: 23–26, 24–21, 22–10, 14–20
: Voigtmann 3 Pts: Avramović 21
Rebs: N. Jović 8
Asts: Bogdanović 5
Mall of Asia Arena, Pasay
Attendance: 12,022
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Omar Bermúdez (MEX), Gatis Saliņš (LAT)

Sources:[57][58]

Starters: Pts Reb Ast
PG 17 Dennis Schröder 28 2 2
SG 42 Andreas Obst 7 0 1
SF 9 Franz Wagner 19 7 2
PF
10 Daniel Theis 2 4 2
C 7 Johannes Voigtmann 12 8 3
Reserves:
PG 0 Isaac Bonga 7 2 0
PG 4 Maodo Lô 0 1 1
SF 5 Niels Giffey 0 0 0
PF
13 Moritz Wagner 8 4 0
PG 21 Justus Hollatz DNP
PF
32 Johannes Thiemann 0 2 2
PG 44 David Krämer DNP
Head coach:
Canada Gordon Herbert
Germany jersey
Team colours
Team colours
Germany
Serbia jersey
Team colours
Serbia

0

Germany Statistics Serbia
20/33 (61%) 2-pt field goals 17/33 (52%)
7/22 (32%) 3-pt field goals 9/29 (31%)
22/25 (88%) Free throws 16/19 (84%)
11 Offensive rebounds 12
24 Defensive rebounds 17
35 Total rebounds 29
13 Assists 14
14 Turnovers 12
5 Steals 9
1 Blocks 2
28 Fouls 25
Starters: Pts Reb Ast
PG 24 Stefan Jović 3 0 0
SG 7 Bogdan Bogdanović 17 3 5
SF 13 Ognjen Dobrić 0 0 0
PF
5 Nikola Jović 9 8 1
C 33 Nikola Milutinov 2 4 4
Reserves:
C 3 Filip Petrušev 10 4 0
SG 9 Vanja Marinković 9 1 0
C 14 Dušan Ristić DNP
SG 23 Marko Gudurić 4 3 2
SF 27 Dejan Davidovac 2 2 0
PF
28 Boriša Simanić DNP
PG 30 Aleksa Avramović 21 4 4
Head coach:
Serbia Svetislav Pešić

Rosters

References

  1. ^
    FIBA
    . 28 April 2023.
  2. RTE
    . 11 September 2023. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  3. ^ "The Best of 2006 World Cup: Spain capture first crown in thrilling World Cup". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  4. ^ "Ball passed to the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2027 in Qatar during special ceremony in Manila". FIBA. 10 September 2023. Retrieved 10 September 2023.
  5. ^ "Qatar Receives 2027 FIBA World Cup Ball". Qatar News Agency. 10 September 2023. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  6. ^ 2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup trophy, FIBA.basketball
  7. ^ "Schroder delivers, Germany win the World Cup". FIBA. 10 September 2023. Retrieved 10 September 2023.
  8. ^ "FIBA World Cup cometh over". The Philippine Star. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 30 June 2023.
  9. ^ Satumbaga, Kristel (11 May 2020). "Dates set for 2023 World Cup". Manila Bulletin. Archived from the original on 13 September 2020. Retrieved 12 May 2020.
  10. ^ "FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 co-host Indonesia to battle it out for direct qualification". FIBA. 3 August 2020. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  11. ^ "FIBA Asia Cup 2022 Results: Defeat, Indonesia Fails to Qualify FIBA World Cup 2023". newsdelivers.com. 18 July 2022. Archived from the original on 23 December 2022. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  12. ^ "How to Qualify". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  13. ^ "Men's National Team Competition System". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  14. ^ "The FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 Draw Principles explained". FIBA. 21 April 2023. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  15. ^ Rubio, Fidel (24 August 2023). "2023 FIBA Basketball World Cup format explained: group phase, rounds, and elimination". Diario AS. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  16. ^ "Everything you need to know about the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  17. ^ "Down go the champs: Canada knock out Spain in thriller". FIBA. 3 September 2023. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  18. ^ "Final standings of the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  19. ^ a b c Go, Beatrice (10 September 2023). "How dark horses Serbia and Germany reached FIBA World Cup final". Al Jazeera. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  20. ^ "Germany stun Serbia, U.S. march on in basketball worlds". Reuters. Reuters.com. 29 August 2010. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  21. ^ "Teodosic elation after big win over Boomers". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  22. ^ "USA beat Serbia to take third gold medal in a row". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  23. ^ "Scola & Campazzo magic helps Argentina eliminate Serbia – FIBA Basketball World Cup 2019". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  24. ^ "Serbia at the FIBA EuroBasket 2022". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  25. ^ Urbonas, Donatas (11 September 2022). "Svetislav Pesic reacts to major EuroBasket upset". basketnews.com. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  26. ^ "Qualified Team Focus – Germany: Schroder and co. out to build on EuroBasket success". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  27. ^ "New Zealand v Germany – 2002 FIBA World Cup game results". Archive.fiba.com. 8 September 2002.
  28. ^ "Germany hold off Poland comeback to claim third place". fiba.basketball. 18 September 2022. Retrieved 8 September 2023.
  29. ^ a b "Manila – Mall of Asia Arena". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  30. ^ Robas-Macawile, Sharon (14 April 2012). "The Arena elevates viewing to a new level". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  31. ^ All eyes on the Arena Archived 10 June 2012 at the Wayback Machine, Malaya, 7 June 2012
  32. ^ Olan, Sarah Jayne (16 January 2015). "Fast Facts: Mall of Asia Arena". Rappler. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  33. ^ "Arena Information". Mall of Asia Arena. SM Lifestyle Entertainment, Inc. Archived from the original on 11 May 2021. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  34. ^ de la Fuente, Franz Jonathan (14 October 2011). "SM bares strategy for new arena". BusinessWorld. Retrieved 10 May 2019.
  35. ^ Giongco, Mark (7 July 2012). "B-Meg nails crucial semis win over Talk 'N Text at MOA Arena". INQUIRER.net. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  36. ^ "Big Dome still main PBA venue, but MOA Arena an alternative option – InterAksyon.com – Sports5". interaksyon.com. Archived from the original on 6 March 2014.
  37. ^ "Hataw Tabloid – D'yaryo ng bayan". hatawtabloid.com. Archived from the original on 3 January 2013. Retrieved 22 June 2012.
  38. ^ http://www.coolbuster.net/2011/06/sm-arena-home-of-ncaa-88-uaap-season-75.html Archived September 27, 2020, at the Wayback Machine SM Arena: Home of NCAA 88, UAAP Season 75 Retrieved 06 July 2011
  39. ^ "New SM arena to host majority of UAAP basketball games". InterAKTV. 13 May 2012. Archived from the original on 15 June 2012.
  40. ^ "2016 FIBA Olympic Qualifying Tournament in the Philippines". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  41. ^ "SEA Games basketball to be held at MOA Arena, after all". Philippine Daily Inquirer. 20 March 2019. Retrieved 23 March 2019.
  42. ^ "Result System". rs.2019seagames.com. Archived from the original on 12 December 2019.
  43. ^ "Games of the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2019 Asian Qualifiers 2019". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  44. ^ "Philippines-Japan tiff confirmed at MOA Arena". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  45. ^ "Games of the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 Asian Qualifiers". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  46. ^ Saldajeno, Ian Stewart (28 April 2023). "FIBA moves World Cup final round from Bulacan to Pasay arena". Philippine News Agency. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  47. ^ "Competition System". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  48. ^ "Manila – Philippine Arena". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  49. ^ "FIBA.basketball". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  50. ^ "FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 Asian Qualifiers". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  51. ^ "Cayetano puts 2019 SEAG hosting in motion". Manila Bulletin. 4 March 2018. Archived from the original on 16 July 2019. Retrieved 5 March 2018.
  52. ^ "FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 final phase to be played at MOA Arena, Gilas to open campaign at Philippine Arena | SBP". sbp.ph. Retrieved 28 April 2023.
  53. ^ "Final standings of the FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  54. ^ "Media Predictions: Winners, MVP, stats leaders and disappointments". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 11 September 2023.
  55. ^ a b c "Germany beats Serbia in FIBA World Cup final, captures its first title". basketnews.com. 10 September 2023. Retrieved 10 September 2023.
  56. ^ "FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 All-Star Five has been announced". basketnews.com. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  57. ^ "Germany v Serbia boxscore – FIBA Basketball World Cup 2023 – 10 September". FIBA.basketball. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  58. ^ "Germany vs Serbia scores & predictions | Sofascore". www.sofascore.com. Retrieved 13 September 2023.
  59. ^ "Team roster: Germany" (PDF). FIBA. 25 August 2023.
  60. ^ "Team roster: Serbia" (PDF). FIBA. 25 August 2023.

External links