3-Chlorobenzonitrile

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3-Chlorobenzonitrile
3-Chlorobenzonitrile.svg
Names
Other names
meta-Chlorobenzonitrile
Identifiers
3D model (
JSmol
)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard
100.011.065 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 212-172-6
  • InChI=1S/C7H4ClN/c8-7-3-1-2-6(4-7)5-9/h1-4H
    Key: WBUOVKBZJOIOAE-UHFFFAOYSA-N
  • C1=CC(=CC(=C1)Cl)C#N
Properties
C7H4ClN
Molar mass 137.57 g·mol−1
Appearance colorless solid
Melting point 40–41 °C (104–106 °F; 313–314 K)[1]
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation mark
Danger
H302, H312, H319
P264, P270, P273, P280, P301+P312, P302+P352, P305+P351+P338, P312, P322, P330, P337+P313, P361, P363, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).

3-Chlorobenzonitrile is an organic compound with the chemical formula ClC6H4CN. It is one of the isomers of chlorobenzonitrile.

Preparation and reactions

Typically, aryl nitriles are produced by ammoxidation.[2] 3-Chlorobenzonitrile can also be produced by dehydration of the

aldoxime of 3-chlorobenzaldehyde.[3] It can also produced by heating 3-chlorobenzylamine and iodine in ammonium acetate aqueous solution.[4]

In the presence of copper nanoparticles, 3-chlorobenzonitrile can be reduced by sodium borohydride to 3-chlorobenzylamine.[5] Some ruthenium catalyzers can catalysis the hydrolysis of 3-chlorobenzonitrile to form 3-chlorobenzamide.[6]

References

  1. ISSN 0009-2673. Retrieved 2021-12-20.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link
    )
  2. .
  3. doi:10.1016/j.tetlet.2011.12.036. Retrieved 2021-12-20.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link
    )
  4. . Retrieved 2021-12-20.
  5. S2CID 140005906. Retrieved 2021-12-20.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link
    )
  6. PMID 18567025. Retrieved 2021-12-20.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link
    )