Arnold Walker (rugby league)

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Arnold Walker
Personal information
Full nameThomas Arnold Walker
Born(1952-04-15)15 April 1952
Whitehaven, Cumbria, England
Died12 May 2022(2022-05-12) (aged 70)
Playing information
PositionStand-off, Scrum-half
Club
Years Team Pld T G FG P
1971–80 Workington Town 191+4 53 2 35
1980–83 Whitehaven
Total 195 53 2 35 0
Representative
Years Team Pld T G FG P
≤1980–≥80 Cumbria 19 ≥1
1981 England 1 0 0 0 0
1980 Great Britain 1 0 0 0 0
Coaching information
Club
Years Team Gms W D L W%
1981 Whitehaven RLFC 0 0 0 0
Source: [1]

Thomas Arnold Walker (15 April 1952 – 12 May 2022)[2], also known by the nickname of "Boxer", was an English professional rugby league footballer who played in the 1970s and 1980s. He played at representative level for Great Britain, England and Cumbria, and at club level for Kells A.R.L.F.C., and Cumbrian rivals; Workington Town and Whitehaven, as a stand-off, or scrum-half, i.e. number 6, or 7.[1]

Background

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker was born in Whitehaven, Cumberland, England, he earned the nickname 'Boxer' as a child after he received a pair of boxing gloves as a gift; in his own words, "I wore them everyday [sic?], the name just stuck."[citation needed] He worked for 12-years at the Haig Colliery, Kells, Whitehaven.

He played professional rugby league for both Workington and Whitehaven and has the unusual honour of still being loved by both sets of fans, despite the fierce rivalry that exists between them.[citation needed] He transferred between the clubs for a fee of £30,000. He earned a reputation for being a hard man on the pitch due to his insatiable appetite for battle and fearless style of play no matter who the opposition.[citation needed] In October 1981, he suffered a serious neck injury in a match against Hull Kingston Rovers, resulting in the match being abandoned.[3] He ended his playing career after suffering a second injury at the start of the 1983–84 season against Widnes.[4] Arnold 'Boxer' Walker still resided in his home town of Kells, Whitehaven.[citation needed]

Playing career

International honours

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker won a cap for England while at Whitehaven in 1981 against France,[5] and won a cap for Great Britain while at Whitehaven in 1980 against New Zealand.[6]

International honours

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker won cap(s) for Cumbria while at Workington Town, including the 9-3 victory over New Zealand at Recreation Ground, Whitehaven during October 1980.

County Cup Final appearances

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker played scrum-half in Workington Town's 11-16 defeat by Widnes in the 1976 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1976–77 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 30 October 1976, played scrum-half, scored 2-drop goals, and was man of the match in the 16-13 victory over Wigan in the 1977 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1977–78 season at Wilderspool Stadium, Warrington on Saturday 29 October 1977, played scrum-half, and was man of the match in the 13-15 defeat by Widnes in the 1978 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1978–79 season at Central Park, Wigan on Saturday 7 October 1978, and played scrum-half in the 0-11 defeat by Widnes in the 1979 Lancashire County Cup Final during the 1979–80 season at The Willows, Salford on Saturday 8 December 1979.

Open Rugby World XIII

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker was selected at scrum-half in the 1980 Open Rugby World XIII.

Honoured at both Workington Town, and Whitehaven

Arnold 'Boxer' Walker is both a Workington Town, and Whitehaven Hall Of Fame Inductee.

References

  1. ^ a b "Statistics at rugbyleagueproject.org". rugbyleagueproject.org. 31 December 2017. Retrieved 1 January 2018.
  2. ^ Former West Cumbrian half-back Arnold Walker dies aged 70
  3. ^ "Serious injury to Walker". The Guardian. London. 12 October 1981. p. 21 – via ProQuest.
  4. ^ "Big hearted Boxer had the X factor". Whitehaven News. Newsquest Media Group. 10 August 2006. Retrieved 11 February 2022.
  5. ^ "England Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 21 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2012.
  6. ^ "Great Britain Statistics at englandrl.co.uk". englandrl.co.uk. 31 December 2011. Archived from the original on 20 April 2018. Retrieved 1 January 2012.

External links