List of carillons of the British Isles

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

A red brick tower surrounded by trees and topped with a aged copper observation deck
The Loughborough Carillon in Loughborough, England, memorialises fallen soldiers of the First World War

Carillons, musical instruments in the percussion family with at least 23 cast bells and played with a keyboard, are found throughout the British Isles as a result of the First World War. During the German occupation of Belgium, many of the country's carillons were silenced or destroyed. This news circulated among the Allied Powers, who saw it as "the brutal annihilation of a unique democratic music instrument".[1][2] The destruction was romanticized in poetry and music, particularly in England. Poets – often exaggerating reality – wrote that the Belgian carillons were in mourning and awaited to ring out on the day of the country's liberation. Edward Elgar composed a work for orchestra which includes motifs of bells and a spoken text anticipating the victory of the Belgian people.[3] He later even composed a work specifically for the carillon.[4] Following the war, countries in the Anglosphere built their own carillons to memorialise the lives lost and to promote world peace,[2] including two in England.[5]

The Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland (CSBI) counts carillons throughout the British Isles.[6] Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers, a publication that historically concerns itself with bell sets outfitted for full circle ringing, also counts carillons in the region.[7] According to the two sources, there are fifteen carillons: eight in England, one in the Republic of Ireland, one in Northern Ireland, and five in Scotland. There are no carillons in Guernsey, the Isle of Man, Jersey or Wales.[6]

The heaviest carillon is at the Kirk of St Nicholas in Aberdeen, Scotland, weighing 25,846 kilograms (56,981 lb); the lightest is at the Atkinsons Building in London, weighing 3,194 kilograms (7,041 lb). The carillon of St Colman's Cathedral in Cobh has the most bells – 49. The region has several two- and three-octave carillons. The heaviest two-octave carillon in the world – weighing 22,669 kg (49,976 lb) – is located in Newcastle upon Tyne.[8] The carillons were primarily constructed in the interwar period by the English bellfounders Gillett & Johnston and John Taylor & Co.[6] Almost all of the carillons are transposing instruments, all of which transpose such that the lowest note on the keyboard is C.[6]

According to the World Carillon Federation [nl], the carillons of the British Isles account for two percent of the world's total.[9]

England

List of carillons in England
Location City Bells Bourdon weight Total weight Range and
transposition
Bellfounder(s) Ref.
kg lb kg lb
Junior School and Carillon, Bournville - geograph.org.uk - 315194.jpg
Bournville Junior School Bournville 48 3,260 7,186 17,655 38,923
[10][11]
Flamingo's aan bat - Charterhouse School, 1 augustus 2006.jpg
Charterhouse School[a] Godalming 37 951 2,097 6,790 14,969 John Taylor & Co 1921–23 [12][13][14]
Burlington Gardens 1 (5820512459).jpg
Atkinsons Building London 23 620 1,360 3,194 7,041 Gillett & Johnston 1925–27 [15][16]
Loughborough Carillon - geograph.org.uk - 3930.jpg
Loughborough Carillon Loughborough 47 4,232 9,330 20,986 46,266 John Taylor & Co 1923–29 [17][18][19]
Centre civique Newcastle Tyne 7.jpg
Newcastle Civic Centre Newcastle upon Tyne 25 3,626 7,993 22,669 49,976 John Taylor & Co 1963–67 [8][20]
St Mary's Lowe House, St Helens - geograph.org.uk - 511032.jpg
Church of St Mary, Lowe House St Helens, Merseyside 47 4,302 9,484 21,234 46,813 John Taylor & Co 1929 [21][22]
Catholic Church of Our Lady of the Rosary and St Therese - geograph.org.uk - 247066.jpg
Our Lady of the Rosary and St Therese of Lisieux RC Church Saltley 23 870 1,918 4,565 10,064 Gillett & Johnston 1932 [23][24]
YorkMinsterWest.jpg
York Minster York 35 1,215 2,679 6,867 15,139 John Taylor & Co 1933–2008 [25][26]

Northern Ireland

List of carillons in Northern Ireland
Location City Bells Bourdon weight Total weight Range and
transposition
Bellfounder(s) Ref.
kg lb kg lb
ArmaghRCCathedral.JPG
St Patrick's Cathedral Armagh 39 2,190 4,830 10,850 23,910 ) John Taylor & Co 1920 [27][28]

Republic of Ireland

According to the CSBI, there is one carillon in the Republic of Ireland, which is located at St Colman's Cathedral in Cobh.[6] In 2019, playing this cathedral's carillon was recognized by the Irish government as key element of the country's living cultural heritage.[29]

List of carillons in the Republic of Ireland
Location City Bells Bourdon weight Total weight Range and
transposition
Bellfounder(s) Ref.
kg lb kg lb
St Colman's Cathedral in Cobh - panoramio.jpg
St Colman's Cathedral Cobh 49 3,439 7,582 22,327 49,223 [30][31]

Scotland

List of carillons in Scotland
Location City Bells Bourdon weight Total weight Range and
transposition
Bellfounder(s) Ref.
kg lb kg lb
St Nicholas Kirk.jpg
Kirk of St Nicholas Aberdeen 48 4,571 10,078 25,846 56,981 Gillett & Johnston 1952–54 [32][33]
St Patrick's Church Dumbarton 23 860 1,900 4,603 10,148 Gillett & Johnston 1927–28 [34][35]
St. Marnock's Parish Church, Kilmarnock - geograph.org.uk - 1610388.jpg
St Marnock's Church Kilmarnock 30 635 1,401 4,272 9,418 Mears & Stainbank (Whitechapel) 1954 [36][37]
St John's Kirk, Perth, Church of Scotland - geograph.org.uk - 566572.jpg
St John's Kirk Perth 35 1,430 3,150 7,883 17,379
[38][39]
Holy Trinity Church, St Andrews.jpg
Holy Trinity Church St Andrews 27 1,593 3,512 7,587 16,726 John Taylor & Co 1926–98 [40][41]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The carillon was moved from the Mostyn House School in 2010.

References

  1. ^ Thorne, Stephen J. (21 November 2018). "The Seizing of Europe's Bells". Legion. OCLC 1120054332. Archived from the original on 26 January 2021. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  2. ^ a b "Carillons and Peace". War Memorial and Peace Carillons. Retrieved 1 August 2022.
  3. ^ Rombouts, Luc (2014). "The Broken Bells of Flanders". Singing Bronze: A History of Carillon Music. Translated by Communicationwise. Leuven University Press. pp. 195–200. ISBN 978-90-5867-956-7.
  4. ^ Orr, Scott Allan (2022). "The Origins, Development, and Legacy of Elgar's Memorial Chimes (1923)". Beiaard- en klokkencultuur in de Lage Landen [Carillon and Bell Culture in the Low Countries] (1 ed.). Amsterdam University Press. 1: 81–101. doi:10.5117/BKL2022.1.004.ORR. S2CID 249082470.
  5. ^ "World map of peace carillons". War Memorial and Peace Carillons. Archived from the original on 29 December 2020. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Carillons in Britain and Ireland". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 19 July 2022.
  7. ^ "About Dove's Guide". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Retrieved 26 July 2022.
  8. ^ a b "Edith Adamson Carillon, Newcastle Civic Centre". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  9. ^ "Carillons". World Carillon Federation. Archived from the original on 11 January 2021. Retrieved 30 January 2021.
  10. ^ "George Cadbury Memorial Carillon, Bournville Village Primary School". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  11. ^ "Birmingham, West Midlands, Bournville Village Primary School, Bournville". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  12. ^ "War Memorial Carillon, Charterhouse School". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  13. ^ "Godalming, Surrey, Charterhouse School". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  14. ^ "Godalming, World War I Memorial Carillon (United Kingdom)". War Memorial and Peace Carillons. Archived from the original on 7 May 2021. Retrieved 4 July 2022.
  15. ^ "Atkinson Carillon, Old Bond Street". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  16. ^ "Mayfair, Greater London, 24 Old Bond St". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  17. ^ "Loughborough Carillon and War Memorial". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  18. ^ "Loughborough, Leicestershire, War Memorial, Queen's Park". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  19. ^ "Loughborough, War Memorial Carillon (United Kingdom)". War Memorial and Peace Carillons. Archived from the original on 2 May 2019. Retrieved 4 July 2022.
  20. ^ "Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, Civic Centre". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  21. ^ "Church of St. Mary, Lowe House". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  22. ^ "St Helens, Merseyside, S Mary, Lowe House (RC)". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 31 May 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  23. ^ "Our Lady's Carillon". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  24. ^ "Birmingham, West Midlands, Our Lady of the Rosary and S Therese of Lisieux, Saltley (RC)". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  25. ^ "The Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of St Peter [York Minster]". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  26. ^ "York, North Yorkshire, Cath & Metropolitical Ch of S Peter". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  27. ^ "St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  28. ^ "Armagh, Armagh, Northern Ireland, Cath Ch of S Patrick (RC)". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  29. ^ "Minister Madigan Announces State Recognition of Key Elements of Ireland's Living Cultural Heritage" (Press release). Dublin: Minister for Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht. MerrionStreet.ie. 18 July 2019. Archived from the original on 27 February 2021. Retrieved 4 May 2022.
  30. ^ "St Colman's Cathedral". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  31. ^ "Cobh, Cork, Republic of Ireland, Cath Ch of S Colman (RC)". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 5 April 2022.
  32. ^ "Municipal Carillon, The Kirk of St Nicholas". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  33. ^ "Aberdeen, City of Aberdeen, Scotland, S Nicholas Kirk". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  34. ^ "St Patrick's Church". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  35. ^ "Dumbarton, West Dunbartonshire, Scotland, S Patrick (RC)". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  36. ^ "St Andrew's & St Marnock's Parish Church". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  37. ^ "Kilmarnock, East Ayrshire, Scotland, S Marnock". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  38. ^ "St John's Kirk". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  39. ^ "Perth, Perth and Kinross, Scotland, S John Kirk". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  40. ^ "Holy Trinity Parish Church". Carillon Society of Britain and Ireland. Retrieved 3 July 2022.
  41. ^ "St Andrews, Fife, Scotland, Holy Trinity". Dove's Guide for Church Bell Ringers. Archived from the original on 5 April 2022. Retrieved 3 July 2022.

Further reading

External links