Michael S. Engel

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Michael S. Engel
Born (1971-09-24) September 24, 1971 (age 52)
Charles D. Michener

Michael S. Engel,

Arabia, eastern Africa, the high Arctic, and South and North America, and has published more than 925 papers in scientific journals[3] and over 1000 new living and fossil species.[citation needed] Some of Engel's research images were included in exhibitions on the aesthetic value of scientific imagery.[4]

Career

Engel received a B.Sc. in physiology and cell biology and a B.A. in chemistry from the

Guggenheim Fellow,[9][10] completing work on the geological history of termites and their influence on carbon recycling in paleoenvironments.[11] This period also permitted significant work on the comprehensive work, Treatise on the Termites of the World.[12] In 2008 he received the Charles Schuchert Award[13][14] of the Paleontological Society and subsequently the Bicentenary Medal[15] of the Linnean Society of London (2009) for his contributions to the fields of systematic entomology and paleontology. In Spring 2014 he was awarded the Scholarly Achievement Award of the University of Kansas for his contributions to the evolutionary and developmental origins of insect flight;[16] and in 2015 the International Cooperation Award from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.[17] In 2017, Engel was elected as a Fellow of the Entomological Society of America[18] and received the society's Thomas Say Award.[19] In Spring 2019, Innumerable Insects won a Silver Award in the Nautilus Book Award.[20] In October 2022, Engel was elected as a Fellow of AAAS.[21]

Personal life

Engel married Kellie K. Magill on April 25, 2009, in a ceremony performed by Engel's father.[22]

Eponymy

The following species or genera have been proposed in honor of Dr. Engel, ( denotes extinct taxa):

  • Anotylus engeli Makranczy, 2011 (an oxyteline rove beetle from Bolivia)[23]
  • Archaeoellipes engeli Heads, 2010 (a
    Dominican Amber)[24]
  • Archaeoserphites engeli Rasnitsyn & Ohm-Kuhnle, 2020 (an archaeoserphitid wasp in Burmese amber)[25]
  • Archaeovespa engeli Wu, Shih, Ren, & Gao, 2021 (a vespid wasp in Kachin amber)[26]
  • Archeofoenus engeli Turrisi & Ellenberger, 2019 (an aulacid wasp from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[27]
  • Braunsapis engeli Jobiraj, 2004 (a small allodapine bee from southern India)[28]
  • Chlorepyris engeli Colombo & Azevedo, 2021 (a flat wasp in Baltic amber)[29]
  • Cretogramma engeli Liu et al., 2018 (a kalligrammatid lacewing from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[30]
  • Cretopiesma engelgrimaldii Azar, Heiss, & Huang, 2020 (a flat bug from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[31]
  • Cretoquadratus engeli Chen, 2019 (a ship-timber beetles from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[32]
  • Cretostylops engeli Grimaldi & Kathirithamby, 2005 (the oldest fossil Strepsiptera, from Burmese amber)[33]
  • Deltoxyela engeli Wang, Shih, Ren, & Gao, 2020 (a sawfly from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[34]
  • Dolichoraphidia engeli Liu & al., 2016 (a
    snakefly from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[35]
  • Elmomantis engeli Prokop et al., 2017 (a miomopteran from the Permian of Kansas)[36]
  • Engelitermes Romero Arias, Roisin, & Scheffrahn, 2023 (a genus of Termitidae from Cameroon)[37]
  • Engelitermitinae Romero Arias, Roisin, & Scheffrahn, 2023 (a subfamily of Termitidae from Cameroon)[38]
  • Engellestes Nel & al., 2012 (a genus of damselfly-like odonates from the Permian of Russia)[39]
  • Eufriesea engeli Gonzalez & Griswold, 2017 (an orchid bee from Mexico)[40]
  • Kronocharon engeli Wunderlich, 2015 (a whipspider from Cretaceous Burmese amber)[41]
  • Lasioglossum engeli Genaro, 2001 (a halictine bee from Cuba)[42]
  • Melitta engeli Michez, 2012 (a
    melittine bee from Kyrgyzstan)[43]
  • Mesophthirus engeli Gao, Shih, Rasnitsyn, & Ren, 2019 (a coccoid crawler from Cretaceous Burmese amber[44][45][46])
  • Mesoserphites engeli Herbert & McKellar, 2022 (a serphitid wasp in Burmese amber)[47]
  • Milesitermes engeli Jouault & Nel, 2021 (a termite in Burmese amber)[48]
  • Sigmophlebia engeli Béthoux & Beckemeyer, 2007 (a protorthopteran from the Early Permian of Oklahoma)[49]
  • Sphecodes engeli Astafurova & Proshchalykin, 2020 (a cuckoo bee from Laos)[50]
  • Triepeolus engeli Rightmyer, 2008 (an epeoline bee from Texas)[51]
  • Vostox engeli Estrada-Álvarez & Núñez-Bazán, 2023 (a spongiphorine earwig in Mexican amber)[52]
  • Xenosycorax engeli Azar & Salamé, 2015 (a
    psychodid fly in New Jersey amber)[53]

Publications

Books

  • Innumerable Insects: The Story of the Most Diverse and Myriad Animals on Earth (Natural Histories), 2018.[55]

References

  1. ^ "On the record". Lawrence Journal-World. May 4, 2009.
  2. ^ "On the record". Lawrence Journal-World. May 4, 2009.
  3. ^ "Publications List - Michael S Engel". publicationslist.org. Publications List .org. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  4. ^ "Images From Science". RIT.edu. Archived from the original on September 6, 2008.
  5. S2CID 133440563
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  6. .
  7. ^ "Promotions, awards of tenure announced". oread.ku.edu. January 5, 2013.
  8. ^ "Three KU faculty receive status of University Distinguished Professor". today.ku.edu. July 16, 2018.
  9. ^ "Michael S. Engel". GF.org. Archived from the original on July 26, 2011.
  10. ^ "Whats the buzz". GF.org.
  11. .
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  13. .
  14. .
  15. ^ "The Bicentenary Medal". www.linnean.org.
  16. ^ "Chancellor to present University Scholarly Achievement Awards on April 15". KU.edu. April 8, 2014.
  17. ^ "Chinese Academy of Sciences announces International Cooperation Award for Young Scientists".
  18. ^ "List of ESA Fellows". entsoc.org. The Entomological Society of America. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  19. ^ "Winners of the Systematics, Evolution, and Biodiversity (SysEB) Thomas Say Award". entsoc.org. The Entomological Society of America. Retrieved January 6, 2023.
  20. ^ "2018 Silver Winners".
  21. ^ https://www.aaas.org/page/2022-fellows-0. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ "On the record". Lawrence Journal-World. May 4, 2009.
  23. ^ Makranczy, G. (2011). "Four new Neotropical species of Anotylus with an interesting sexual dimorphism (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae: Oxytelinae)". Annales Historico-Naturales Musei Nationalis Hungarici. 103: 43–64.
  24. S2CID 84322530
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  28. ^ Rajmohana, K.; Sudheer, K.; Girish Kumar, P.; Santhosh, S., ed. (2004). "A new species, a new subspecies and a new record of Braunsapis Michener (Hymenoptera: Apidae) from India.". Perspectives on biosystematics and biodiversity. Prof. T.C. Narendran commemoration volume. Kerala: Systematic Entomology Research Scholars Association. pp. 527–538.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: editors list (link)
  29. S2CID 232313171
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  41. ^ Jörg Wunderlich (2015). "New and rare fossil Arachnida in Cretaceous Burmese Amber (Amblypygi, Ricinulei and Uropygi: Thelephonida)" (PDF). In Jörg Wunderlich (ed.). Beiträge zur Araneologie, 9: Mesozoic spiders and other fossil arachnids. pp. 409–436.
  42. ^ Genaro, J. (2001). "Tres especies nuevas del género Lasioglossum (Dialictus), grupo Habralictellus para Cuba (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)". Solenodon. 1: 38–44.
  43. ^ Radchenko, Vladimir G.; Ivanov, Sergey P.; Kuhlmann, Michael; Michez, Denis (June 7, 2012). "Description of four new species of Melitta". Zootaxa. 3337 (1): 57–67.
  44. PMID 33674573
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  49. ^ Béthoux, O.; Beckemeyer, R. (2007). "New and rare insect species from the Wellington Formation (Orthoptera, Grylloblattodea; Lower Permian, USA)". Alavesia. 1: 49–61.
  50. PMID 32547298
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  51. ^ "A review of the cleptoparasitic bee genus Triepeolus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)-Part I". Zootaxa. February 22, 2008.
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  54. ^ "Evolution of the Insects". cambridge.org. Cambridge University Press. Retrieved January 7, 2023.
  55. ^ "Innumerable Insects The Story of the Most Diverse and Myriad Animals on Earth". unionsquareandco.com. Union Square and Co. Retrieved January 7, 2023.

External links