Ministry for Civil Service Affairs

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The Ministry for Civil Service Affairs[a] (Swedish: Civildepartementet) was a ministry in Sweden, established through the 1840 ministerial reform. The ministry and its most important areas of responsibility were agriculture, bergsrörelse, trade, shipping, factories, crafts and other industries, public roads and other communications.[3] The ministry was headed by the minister for civil service affairs. In 1920, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was replaced by two ministries: the Ministry of Social Affairs and the Ministry of Communications (Transport).[4] The Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was re-established in 1950 and then handled the wage and pension system until 1969 when it became the Ministry of Local Government. In 1983, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was re-established and operated until 1996, when the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was transformed into the Ministry of Internal Affairs which was disestablished two years later.

History

The Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was one of seven ministries that were established through the 1840 ministerial reform. The others were the

Laplanders, and finally in general all civil matters not assigned to another ministry.[5]

Among actual legal issues, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs' handling included issues concerning the establishment, repeal, amendment or declaration of municipal statutes (except those relating to the church or education system) as well as legislative issues concerning insurance institutions and health insurance funds as well as compensation for occupational injuries. The cases were presented before the King by the head of the ministry, who was a cabinet minister and had the title "Minister and Head of the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs", but in everyday speech was usually called the minister for civil service affairs. For the preparation and handling of cases, the minister had at his disposal an office, which in 1906 consisted of a director general for administrative affairs (expeditionschef), four directors (byråchef) (deputy directors, kansliråd), five administrative officers (kanslisekreterare), a senior registry clerk, an advisor assistant in the preparation of insurance matters and a number of extra ordinary officials.[5]

Under the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs were the following central government offices: the Swedish Post Office Board (Generalpoststyrelsen), the

State Secretary at the then Kammarexpeditionen; some of the cases were presented by the State Secretary at the Trade and Finance Office (Handels- och finansexpeditionen).[5]

In 1920, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was replaced by two ministries: the Ministry of Social Affairs and the Ministry of Communications (Transport). In 1950, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was re-established for the wage and pension system.[4] In 1969, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was completely emptied of its old contents and would instead be responsible for the county administrative boards, the municipalities and the national physical planning[4] and then went by the name Ministry of Physical Planning and Local Government.[2] In 1974, the name was changed to the Ministry of Local Government which then ceased on 31 December 1982. On 1 January 1983, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs came in its place as a pure ministry for issues concerning the public sector, for example for issues of working and employment conditions, co-determination and gender equality, Sweden's administrative division, rationalization and audit in central government, computer technology in public administration, statistics, public information, co-determination issues but also administrative matters concerning the Royal Court and Palace Administration (Slottsstaten). In June 1996, the Ministry for Civil Service Affairs was reorganized into the Ministry of the Interior.[6]

Location

In 1983, when the ministry was re-established, it was located at Tysta Marigången 2 and at Rödbodgatan 6 at Norrmalm in Stockholm.[7] By 1984 it had moved across the street to Tegelbacken 2.[8] In 1992, the ministry moved a couple blocks to Fredsgatan 8.[9]

  • Entrance to Tysta Marigången
    Entrance to Tysta Marigången
  • Rödbodgatan 6 (left)
    Rödbodgatan 6 (left)
  • Tegelbacken 2
  • Fredsgatan 8 (far right)
    Fredsgatan 8 (far right)

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ Ministry for Civil Service Affairs[1] or Ministry of Physical Planning and Local Government.[2]
  2. ^ Refers to the highest administrative authority in a county (in Stockholm the Office of the Governor of Stockholm; in Finland a governorate).

References

Notes

  1. ^ Gullberg 1977, p. 136.
  2. ^ a b Gullberg 1977, p. 1320.
  3. ^ a b Hedman, Wegelius & Sundin 2008, p. 17
  4. ^ a b c d Hedman, Wegelius & Sundin 2008, p. 20
  5. ^ a b c d e Meijer & Westrin 1906, pp. 364–365
  6. ^ "Civil -och Inrikesdepartementet Huvudarkivet > Se förteckning" [Ministry for Civil Service Affairs and the Interior Main Archive> See list] (in Swedish). National Archives of Sweden. 2002-06-28. Retrieved 20 May 2022.
  7. ^ Sköldenberg 1983, p. 76
  8. ^ Spiegelberg 1984, p. 76
  9. ^ Spiegelberg 1992, p. 84

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