Patricia A. McKillip

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Patricia Anne McKillip
McKillip in 2011
McKillip in 2011
Born(1948-02-29)February 29, 1948
Salem, Oregon, U.S.
DiedMay 6, 2022(2022-05-06) (aged 74)
Coos Bay-North Bend, Oregon, U.S.
OccupationNovelist
Alma materSan Jose State University
GenreFantasy
Notable awardsMythopoeic Awards 1995, World Fantasy Award 1975 and 2003, World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement 2008

Patricia Anne McKillip (February 29, 1948 – May 6, 2022) was an American author of fantasy and science fiction. She has been called "one of the most accomplished prose stylists in the fantasy genre",[1] and wrote predominantly standalone fantasy novels. Her work won numerous awards, including the World Fantasy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2008.

Personal life

McKillip was born in Salem, Oregon to Wayne and Helen (née Roth) McKillip. She grew up in Oregon, Great Britain, and Germany. She attended the College of Notre Dame (Belmont, California) and San Jose State University (San Jose, California), where she earned her BA and MA degrees in English in the early 1970s.[2]

McKillip was married to David Lunde, a poet.[3]

Death

She died on May 6, 2022, at the age of 74 at her home in Coos Bay-North Bend, Oregon. No cause of death was disclosed.[4][5][6]

Career

McKillip's first publications were two short children's books, The Throme of the Erril of Sherill and The House on Parchment Street.[2] Her first novel, The Forgotten Beasts of Eld, was published in 1974, when she was 26 years old, and won the World Fantasy Award in 1975.[7]

McKillip's Riddle-Master trilogy, published from 1976 to 1979, was regarded by scholar Peter Nicholls as "a work of classic stature".[8] It was selected as part of Gollancz's Fantasy Masterworks series.[9] In 2008, she was a recipient of the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement.[2][10] Most of her recent novels feature cover paintings by Kinuko Y. Craft.

On writing fantasy, McKillip said, "The tropes of mythology and symbolism are the basics. It's like a notation in music; you can change it in really wacky ways, but the sound is always the same, the sound is always there. As long as we need these symbols, then the stories will be written. But if we destroy the old symbols, then we might just have to come up with new ones--who knows?"[7]

Since 1994, McKillip's writing comprised purely standalone novels.[8] Critic Brian Stableford described her as "one of the most accomplished prose stylists in the fantasy genre",[1] while Peter Nicholls and John Clute considered her "perhaps the most impressive author of fantasy story still active".[8]

Awards

McKillip holds the record for the most Mythopoeic Fantasy Awards (four) and nominations (fifteen).[11] She has also won World Fantasy Awards for Best Novel, as well as for Life Achievement.[12]

Awards and nominations
Award Work Result[12]
Hugo Award Harpist in the Wind (1979) Nominated
Locus Award Harpist in the Wind (1979) Won
Mythopoeic Award The Forgotten Beasts of Eld (1974) Nominated
The Changeling Sea (1988) Nominated
The Sorceress and the Cygnet (1991) Nominated
The Cygnet and the Firebird (1993) Nominated
Something Rich and Strange (1994) Won
The Book of Atrix Wolfe (1995) Nominated
Winter Rose (1996) Nominated
Song for the Basilisk (1998) Nominated
Ombria in Shadow (2002) Won
In the Forests of Serre (2003) Nominated
Alphabet of Thorn (2004) Nominated
Solstice Wood (2006) Won
The Bell at Sealey Head (2008) Nominated
The Bards of Bone Plain (2010) Nominated
Kingfisher (2016) Won
Nebula Award Winter Rose (1996) Nominated
The Tower at Stony Wood (2000) Nominated
World Fantasy Award The Forgotten Beasts of Eld (1974) Won
Harpist in the Wind (1979) Nominated
Ombria in Shadow (2002) Won
Od Magic (2005) Nominated

Bibliography

References

Citations

  1. ^ a b Stableford, Brian M. (1997). "McKillip, Patricia A.". In Clute, John; Grant, John (eds.). The Encyclopedia of Fantasy. Archived from the original on 2018-05-06.
  2. ^ a b c Locus June 2011, p. 7.
  3. ^ McKillip, Patricia A. The Bell at Sealey Head. New York: Penguin Books, 2008. Back flap of dust jacket.
  4. ^ "May 13, 2022 Death Notices". The World. May 12, 2022. Retrieved May 17, 2022.
  5. ^ Wang, Amy (May 14, 2022). "Oregon fantasy author Patricia McKillip dies at 74". The Oregonian. Retrieved May 17, 2022.
  6. ^ "Patricia A. McKillip (1948–2022)". Locus. May 10, 2022. Retrieved May 17, 2022.
  7. ^ a b Locus June 2011, p. 67.
  8. ^ a b c Nicholls, Peter; Clute, John (October 26, 2021). "McKillip, Patricia A.". In Clute, John; Langford, David (eds.). The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction (4th ed.).
  9. ^ Walton, Jo (2018). "1980 Hugo Award Winners and Nominees". An Informal History of the Hugos. Tor Books. Archived from the original on 2020-06-21.
  10. ^ "2008: World Fantasy Convention 2008". World Fantasy Convention. Retrieved 2022-03-04.
  11. ^ "Mythopoeic Awards Tallies". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2020-07-16. Retrieved 2021-08-08.
  12. ^ a b "Patricia A. McKillip Awards". Science Fiction Awards Database. Locus Science Fiction Foundation. Archived from the original on 2021-07-28. Retrieved 2021-08-08.

Sources

Further reading

External links

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