List of Roman client rulers

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This is a list of the client rulers of Ancient Rome, sectioned by the kingdom, giving the years the ruler was on the throne, and separating Kings and Queens.

Rome's foreign clients were called amici populi Romani (friends of the Roman people) and listed on the tabula amicorum (table of friends). They did not sign treaties or have formal obligations, but entered into alliance (societas) and friendship (amicitia) with Rome, generally in a dependent state.[1]

Client Kings

Pharos

Bosporan Kingdom

Odrysian Kingdom/Sapaeans

Kingdom of Pontus

Kingdom of Emesa

Kingdom of Judea

Kingdom of Mauretania

Kingdom of Numidia

Kingdom of Chalcis

Kingdom of Armenia

Kingdom of Cilicia

Kingdom of Cappadocia

Parthia

British Tribes

Regni

Tiberius Claudius Cogidubnus

Trinovantes

Cunobeline 9-35 AD

Client Queens

This is a list of the client queens of ancient Rome, sectioned by the kingdom, and giving the years the queen was on the throne.

Bosporan Kingdom

Parthia

Kingdom of Pontus

Odrysian Kingdom

Kingdom of Judea

See also

References

  1. ^ Howard Hayes Scullard and Andrew William Lintott, "Amicitia", in The Oxford Classical Dictionary, 4th ed. (Oxford University Press, 2012).
  2. ^ Hammond, p. 257.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Mitchiner, Michael (1978). The Ancient & Classical World, 600 B.C.-A.D. 650. Hawkins Publications. p. 69. ISBN 978-0-904173-16-1.
  4. ^ McGonigle, Thomas C.; McGonigle, Thomas D.; Quigley, James F. (1988). A History of the Christian Tradition: From its Jewish Origins to the Reformation Volume 1 of A History of the Christian Tradition. Paulist Press.
  5. ^ Peters, Francis E. (2005). The Monotheists: Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Conflict and Competition, Volume II: The Words and Will of God The Words And Will of God. Princeton University Press.
  6. ^ Kasher, Aryeh; Witztum, Eliezer (2007). King Herod: a persecuted persecutor : a case study in psychohistory and psychobiography. Translation by Karen Gold. Walter de Gruyter.
  7. ^ Roller, Duane W. (2003) The World of Juba II and Kleopatra Selene Routledge (UK)ISBN 0-415-30596-9 p. 74
  8. ^ Ancient Library, Archelaus no.3&4 Archived 2012-10-12 at the Wayback Machine
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