List of coupled siblings

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A coin depicting Ptolemy II Philadelphus and his sister-wife Arsinoe II.[1]

This article gives a list of individuals who have been romantically or maritally coupled with a sibling. This list does not include coupled siblings in fiction, although ones from mythology and religion are included.

Terminology

There are many terms used to describe a romantic bond between siblings, including formal nomenclature such as adelphogamy, specific hyponyms such twincest, or slang terms like sibcest.[2][3] In a heterosexual context, a female partner in such a relationship may be referred as a sister-wife.[4] A similar incestuous arrangement which is non-monogamous can be referred as sister-swapping or brother-swapping,[5] although this should not be confused with berdel, which describes the situation in which families exchange brides or bridegrooms.[6]

History

While cousin marriage is legal in most countries, and avunculate marriage is legal in several, sexual relations between siblings are considered incestuous almost universally. Sibling incest is legally prohibited in most countries worldwide. It was historically practiced in ancient Egypt and indigenous Inca tribes.

Innate sexual aversion between siblings forms due to close association in childhood, in what is known as the Westermarck effect. Children who grow up together do not normally develop sexual attraction, even if they are unrelated, and conversely, siblings who were separated at a young age may develop sexual attraction. Thus, many cases of sibling incest, including accidental incest, concern siblings who were separated at birth or at a very young age.

List of coupled siblings

Religion and mythology

In Egyptian mythology

In Abrahamic religions

In Greek mythology

Monarchs

In Ancient Egypt

In classical antiquity

In Inca Peru

In East Asia

In Japan

In the Hawaiian Islands

In medieval and renaissance Europe

Suspected/disputed

Other

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Santiago (1973), pp. 37–39.
  2. ^ Rudmin, Floyd Webster (1992). "Cross-cultural correlates of the ownership of private property: A look from another data base". Anthropologica. 34 (1): 71–88. doi:10.2307/25605633. hdl:1974/2575. JSTOR 25605633.
  3. ^ Cusack, Carmen M. (2017). "Double Glazed: Reflection, Narcissism, and Freudian Implications in Twincest Pornography". JL & Soc. Deviance (13): 1.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Ager, Sheila L. (2005). "Familiarity Breeds: Incest and the Ptolemaic Dynasty". The Journal of Hellenic Studies. 125: 1–34. doi:10.1017/S0075426900007084. ISSN 0075-4269. JSTOR 30033343. PMID 19681234.
  5. ^ Buckner, Jocelyn Louise (2010). Shady Ladies: Sister Acts, Popular Performance, and the Subversion of American Identity (PhD thesis). University of Kansas. hdl:1808/6412.
  6. ^ Uysal, Cem; Kir, Ziya M.; Yaman Goruk, Neval; Atli, Abdullah; Bez, Yasin; Polat, Oguz M. (2014). "Being An Adolescent Mother". Acta Med Anatolia. 2 (1): 14–18. doi:10.15824/actamedica.64756.
  7. ^ Leeming (2006), "Nuwa" & "Fuxi".
  8. ^ Leeming (2006), "Izanagi and Izanami".
  9. ^ Santiago (1973), p. 84.
  10. ^ "Pahlavi Texts, Part II: Appendix: III. The Meaning of Khvêtûk-das or Khvêtûdâd". www.sacred-texts.com. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  11. ^ Leeming (2006), "Freyr" & "Freya".
  12. ^ Larrington, Carolyne (2006). King Arthur's Enchantresses: Morgan and Her Sisters in Arthurian Tradition. London: I.B. Tauris. pp. 127–135. ISBN 9780857714060.
  13. ^ Nut and Geb:
  14. ^ Shu and Tefnut:
  15. ^ Osiris and Isis:
  16. ^ Redford (2005), "Nephthys".
  17. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 25–26.
  18. ^ Abraham and Sarah:
  19. ^ Leeming (2006), "Kronos and Rhea".
  20. ^ a b c d Santiago (1973), pp. 12–13.
  21. ^ Leeming (2006), "Hyperion" & "Theia".
  22. ^ Leeming (2006), "Tethys".
  23. ^ Grant & Hazel (2002), "Phorcys".
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  27. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 12–14.
  28. ^ Leeming (2006), "Demeter and Persephone".
  29. ^ Leeming (2006), "Aphrodite" & "Ares".
  30. ^ Santiago (1973), p. 16.
  31. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 19–20.
  32. ^ Grant & Hazel (2002), "Heracles".
  33. ^ Dodson (2000), p. 105.
  34. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 144–145, 150–151, & 155.
  35. ^ Bunson (2012), "Isetnofret (2)".
  36. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), p. 177.
  37. ^ Menkaure and Khamerernebty II:
  38. ^ Ahmose I and Ahmose-Nefertari:
  39. ^ Santiago (1973), p. 34.
  40. ^ Dodson (2000), p. 72.
  41. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 124 & 126.
  42. ^ Tyldesley (2006), p. 82.
  43. ^ Santiago (1973), p. 33.
  44. ^ Bunson (2012), "'Ahmose-Merytamon".
  45. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 127 & 129.
  46. ^ Redford (2005), "Thutmose I".
  47. ^ Dodson (2000), p. 77.
  48. ^ Thutmose II and Hatshepsut:
  49. ^ Tutankhamun and Ankhesenamun:
  50. ^ Bunson (2012), "Ra'djedef (Djedef-ré)".
  51. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 52, 55, 57, & 59.
  52. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 73 & 76.
  53. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 85 & 88.
  54. ^ Mentuhotep II and Neferu II:
  55. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 92–93 & 97.
  56. ^ Tyldesley (2006), p. 72.
  57. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 92–94 & 96–97.
  58. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 186, 190, & 192.
  59. ^ Tyldesley (2006), p. 171.
  60. ^ Dodson (2000), p. 158.
  61. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 200–202 & 207.
  62. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 200, 203–204, & 206.
  63. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 224, 226–227, & 229.
  64. ^ Tyldesley (2006), pp. 181–182.
  65. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 236–237 & 240.
  66. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 244–246.
  67. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 234–237 & 239–240.
  68. ^ Tyldesley (2006), p. 184.
  69. ^ a b Sears, Matthew A. (2014). "Alexander and Ada Reconsidered". Classical Philology. 109 (3): 213. doi:10.1086/676285. ISSN 0009-837X. JSTOR 10.1086/676285. S2CID 170273543. Hecatomnus had several children, all of whom would rule at some point following his death. After his eldest son Mausolus, his other children were Artemisia, Idrieus, Ada, and Pixodarus. The children of Hecatomnus practiced monogamous sibling marriage, with Mausolus marrying Artemisia and Idrieus marrying Ada.
  70. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 35 & 43.
  71. ^ Santiago (1973), p. 44.
  72. ^ Tyldesley (2006), p. 192.
  73. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 266 & 271.
  74. ^ Lloyd (2010), pp. 163, 168, & 976.
  75. ^ Daryaee, Touraj (1999). "The Coinage of Queen Bōrān and Its Significance for Late Sāsānian Imperial Ideology". Bulletin of the Asia Institute. 13: 77–82. ISSN 0890-4464. JSTOR 24048959.
  76. ^ Darius II and Parysatis:
  77. ^ Dodson & Hilton (2004), pp. 251 & 253.
  78. ^ Dandamayev, Muhammad A. (1990). "Cambyses II". Encyclopaedia Iranica. Fasc. 7. Vol. IV. pp. 726–729.
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  81. ^ a b Mayor, Adrienne (2009). The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome's Deadliest Enemy. Princeton: Princeton University Press. pp. 100, 114, & 326. ISBN 978-0-691-12683-8.
  82. ^ "Aytap". World History Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2 January 2022.
  83. ^ Smith, William (1867). "Iotape (2)". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. Vol. 2. Boston: Little, Brown and Company. p. 614.
  84. ^ Ptolemy IV Philopator and Arsinoe III of Egypt:
  85. ^ a b Santiago (1973), pp. 38–39.
  86. ^ Cleopatra II, Ptolemy VI Philometor, and Ptolemy VIII Physcon:
  87. ^ Bennett, Chris. "Cleopatra IV". Egyptian Royal Genealogy. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  88. ^ Ptolemy IX Soter, Cleopatra IV, and Cleopatra Selene:
  89. ^ Cleopatra Selene and Ptolemy X Alexander I:
  90. ^ Tyldesley (2006), pp. 199–200.
  91. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 38–40.
  92. ^ Roller, Duane W. (2010). Cleopatra: a biography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 64–65. ISBN 978-0-19-536553-5.
  93. ^ Whitehorne, John E. G. (1994). Cleopatras. London: Routledge. p. 214. ISBN 978-0-203-03608-2.
  94. ^ Demetrius I Soter and Laodice V (possibly):
  95. ^ Alexander II of Epirus and Olympias II of Epirus:
  96. ^ a b c d Santiago (1973), p. 81.
  97. ^ Niles (1999), pp. 109–110.
  98. ^ Niles (1999), p. 112.
  99. ^ a b Santiago (1973), pp. 91–92.
  100. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 98–99.
  101. ^ Cranston, Edwin A. (1998). A Waka Anthology: The Gem-Glistening Cup. Vol. 1. Stanford University Press. pp. 804–805. ISBN 9780804731577 – via Google Books.
  102. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 87 & 90.
  103. ^ Van Goethem, Ellen (2008). Bolitho, H.; Radtke, K. (eds.). Nagaoka: Japan's Forgotten Capital. Brill’s Japanese Studies Library. Vol. 29. Leiden: Brill. p. 229. doi:10.1163/9789047433255_017. ISBN 978-90-474-3325-5. ISSN 0925-6512. OCLC 592756297. Kanmu’s next consort was his half-sister Sakahito. She had been appointed high priestess of the Ise shrine in 772, but upon the death of her mother in 775, Sakahito returned to the capital and married Kanmu.
  104. ^ a b c d Spoehr, Anne Harding (1989). The Royal Lineages of Hawai'i. Honolulu: Bishop Museum Press. ISBN 0-930897-33-1. LCCN 87-73394. OCLC 20390598.
  105. ^ "Family tree of Kamehameha-Nui Ai'luau". Geneanet. Retrieved 4 January 2022.
  106. ^ a b c d e f g Fornander (1878), p. 191.
  107. ^ Pilikaʻaiea and Hina-au-kekele:
  108. ^ Fornander (1880), p. 39.
  109. ^ Fornander (1880), p. 69.
  110. ^ a b c d e f Fornander (1878), p. 192.
  111. ^ Fornander (1880), pp. 131–132
  112. ^ Fornander (1880), pp. 111, 234, 130–132
  113. ^ a b c d Santiago (1973), p. 95.
  114. ^ Fornander (1880), pp. 131, 136, 155, 204, & 213.
  115. ^ Flannery, Kent (15 May 2012). The Creation of Inequality: How Our Prehistoric Ancestors Set the Stage for Monarchy, Slavery, and Empire. Harvard University Press. pp. 341–342. ISBN 978-0-674-06497-3.
  116. ^ Fornander (1880), p. 103.
  117. ^ Fornander (1880), p. 127.
  118. ^ Fornander (1880), pp. 128–129.
  119. ^ Fornander (1878), p. 193.
  120. ^ Fornander (1880), p. 228.
  121. ^ Corley, J. Susan (2012). "Queen Kamämalu's Place in Hawaiian History". Hawaiian Journal of History. Hawaiian Historical Society. 46: 37–60. hdl:10524/33793.
  122. ^ Haley (2014), pp. 50 & 78.
  123. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 93–95.
  124. ^ Kamehameha III and Nahienaena:
  125. ^ Vaughan, Richard (1974). Charles the Bold; the last Valois Duke of Burgundy. New York: Barnes & Noble Books. p. 45. ISBN 0-06-497171-6. OCLC 00923275.
  126. ^ Harris, Robin (1994). Valois Guyenne: A Study of Politics, Government, and Society in Late Medieval France. The Royal Historical Society. p. 15. ISBN 0-86193-226-9. ISSN 0269-2244. OCLC 30476453.
  127. ^ "The terrible tale of the Ravalet children, from Tourlaville". Normandy Then and Now. 29 October 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2022.
  128. ^ Julien and Marguerite de Ravalet:
  129. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 55–59.
  130. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 51 & 53–55.
  131. ^ Lord Byron and Augusta Leigh:
  132. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 59–62.
  133. ^ "German incest couple lose European Court case". BBC News. 12 April 2012. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  134. ^ Santiago (1973), pp. 36–37.

Bibliography

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