Template:POTD/Day/testcases

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Today's POTD

{{POTD/Day|2022-10-05}}

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October 5

Trimeresurus gumprechti

Trimeresurus gumprechti, commonly known as Gumprecht's green pit viper, is a species of venomous pit viper in the family Viperidae. Endemic to Asia, it is found in parts of China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam, and is strikingly bright green in color. This female T. gumprechti snake was photographed in Phu Suan Sai National Park in northern Thailand.

Photograph credit: Rushen

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


October 5

Trimeresurus gumprechti

Trimeresurus gumprechti, commonly known as Gumprecht's green pit viper, is a species of venomous pit viper in the family Viperidae. Endemic to Asia, it is found in parts of China, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam, and is strikingly bright green in color. This female T. gumprechti snake was photographed in Phu Suan Sai National Park in northern Thailand.

Photograph credit: Rushen

Non-existent POTD

{{POTD/Day|3000-01-01}}

{{POTD/Day}}


January 1

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


January 1

The featured picture for this day has not yet been chosen.

In general, pictures of the day are scheduled in order of promotion to featured status. See Wikipedia:Picture of the day/Guidelines for full guidelines.

First POTD subpages

{{POTD/Day|2007-01-01}}

{{POTD/Day}}


January 1

Pollination

A honey bee extracts nectar from a flower using its proboscis. Tiny hairs covering the bee's body maintain a slight electrostatic charge, causing pollen from the flower's anthers to stick to the bee's hairs, allowing for pollination when the bee moves on to another flower.

Photo credit: Jon Sullivan

Recently featured:

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


January 1

Pollination

A honey bee extracts nectar from a flower using its proboscis. Tiny hairs covering the bee's body maintain a slight electrostatic charge, causing pollen from the flower's anthers to stick to the bee's hairs, allowing for pollination when the bee moves on to another flower.

Photo credit: Jon Sullivan

Recently featured:
{{POTD/Day|2007-01-02}}

{{POTD/Day}}


January 2

Lincoln cent

The obverse of a proof-quality Lincoln cent with cameo effect. This has been the United States one-cent coin since 1909. Among United States coins, there are more one-cent coins produced than any other denomination. The reverse has featured the Lincoln Memorial since 1959. When the Lincoln cent made its initial appearance, it marked a radical departure from the accepted styling of United States coins. A strong feeling had prevailed against using portraits, but public sentiment stemming from the 100th anniversary celebration of Abraham Lincoln's birth proved stronger than the long-standing prejudice.

Photo credit: U.S. Mint

Recently featured:

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


January 2

Lincoln cent

The obverse of a proof-quality Lincoln cent with cameo effect. This has been the United States one-cent coin since 1909. Among United States coins, there are more one-cent coins produced than any other denomination. The reverse has featured the Lincoln Memorial since 1959. When the Lincoln cent made its initial appearance, it marked a radical departure from the accepted styling of United States coins. A strong feeling had prevailed against using portraits, but public sentiment stemming from the 100th anniversary celebration of Abraham Lincoln's birth proved stronger than the long-standing prejudice.

Photo credit: U.S. Mint

Recently featured:
{{POTD/Day|2007-01-03}}

{{POTD/Day}}


January 3

Clock Tower, Palace of Westminster

The Clock Tower is a turret clock structure at the north-eastern end of the Houses of Parliament building in Westminster, London. It is colloquially and popularly known as Big Ben; however this name actually belongs to the clock's main bell. It was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design of a new palace, after the old one was destroyed by fire. The tower is designed in the Victorian Gothic style, and is 96.3 metres (316 feet) high.

Photo credit: Diliff

Recently featured:

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


January 3

Clock Tower, Palace of Westminster

The Clock Tower is a turret clock structure at the north-eastern end of the Houses of Parliament building in Westminster, London. It is colloquially and popularly known as Big Ben; however this name actually belongs to the clock's main bell. It was raised as a part of Charles Barry's design of a new palace, after the old one was destroyed by fire. The tower is designed in the Victorian Gothic style, and is 96.3 metres (316 feet) high.

Photo credit: Diliff

Recently featured:
{{POTD/Day|2007-01-04}}

{{POTD/Day}}


January 4

Atlantic salmon

An Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) egg hatching. The Alevin (larva) has grown around the remains of the yolk sac - visible are the arteries spinning around the yolk and little oildrops, also the gut, the spine, the main caudal blood vessel, the bladder and the arcs of the gills. In about 24 hours it will be a fry without yolk sac.

Photo credit: Uwe Kils

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


January 4

Atlantic salmon

An Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) egg hatching. The Alevin (larva) has grown around the remains of the yolk sac - visible are the arteries spinning around the yolk and little oildrops, also the gut, the spine, the main caudal blood vessel, the bladder and the arcs of the gills. In about 24 hours it will be a fry without yolk sac.

Photo credit: Uwe Kils

Random selection

Template:POTD/2014-06-25 (random selection)
{{POTD/Day|2014-06-25}}

{{POTD/Day}}


June 25

Subpage 1

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $1 Silver Certificate, of which 35,052,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 2

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $5 Federal Reserve Note, of which 9,416,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 3

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $10 Federal Reserve Note, of which 10,424,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 4

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $20 Federal Reserve Note, of which 11,246,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


June 25

Chosen at random from a selection of four; all alternatives shown below

Subpage 1

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $1 Silver Certificate, of which 35,052,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 2

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $5 Federal Reserve Note, of which 9,416,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 3

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $10 Federal Reserve Note, of which 10,424,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:

Subpage 4

Hawaii overprint note

The Hawaii overprint notes, an emergency issue of U.S. currency overprinted with the word Hawaii, became the only bills allowed to be used there following the attack on Pearl Harbor. Any money captured by the Japanese if they invaded Hawaii could then be easily distinguished. The bills were introduced on June 25, 1942, and withdrawn effective April 1946; many were destroyed.

Shown here is a $20 Federal Reserve Note, of which 11,246,000 were printed. This bill is scanned from the collections of the National Numismatic Collection at the Smithsonian Institution.

See another banknote

Banknote: Bureau of Engraving and Printing (image courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution)

Recently featured:
Template:POTD/2014-06-26 (random selection on previous day)
{{POTD/Day|2014-06-26}}

{{POTD/Day}}


June 26

Dioctria atricapilla

Dioctria atricapilla is a species of robber fly in the subfamily Dasypogoninae. Measuring 9–12 mm (0.35–0.47 in) in length, with a 7–9 mm (0.28–0.35 in) wingspan, it feeds mainly on smaller flies and predatory hymenopterans.

Photo: Richard Bartz

{{POTD/Day/sandbox}}


June 26

Dioctria atricapilla

Dioctria atricapilla is a species of robber fly in the subfamily Dasypogoninae. Measuring 9–12 mm (0.35–0.47 in) in length, with a 7–9 mm (0.28–0.35 in) wingspan, it feeds mainly on smaller flies and predatory hymenopterans.

Photo: Richard Bartz