Helsingborg

Coordinates: 56°03′N 12°43′E / 56.050°N 12.717°E / 56.050; 12.717
Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Helsingborg
Top: Sofiero Palace, Second left: Kärnan, Second right: Rådhuset (Helsingborg City Hall), Third left: Dunker Culture House, Third right: Ramlösa mineral water source site, Bottom: A cruise terminal in Helsingborg Bredgatan Port
Top: Sofiero Palace, Second left: Kärnan, Second right: Rådhuset (Helsingborg City Hall), Third left: Dunker Culture House, Third right: Ramlösa mineral water source site, Bottom: A cruise terminal in Helsingborg Bredgatan Port
UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
25x xxx
Area code(+46) 42
Websitewww.helsingborg.se

Helsingborg (

ninth-largest in Sweden, with a population of 113,816 (2020). Helsingborg is the central urban area of northwestern Scania and Sweden's closest point to Denmark: the Danish city Helsingør is clearly visible about 4 km (2.5 mi) to the west on the other side of the Øresund
.

Historic Helsingborg, with its many old buildings, is a scenic coastal city. The buildings are a blend of old-style stone-built churches and a 600-year-old medieval fortress (Kärnan) in the city centre, and more modern commercial buildings. The streets vary from wide avenues to small alley-ways. Kullagatan, the main pedestrian shopping street in the city, was the first pedestrian shopping street in Sweden.

History

Helsingborg is one of the oldest cities of what is now Sweden. It has been the site of permanent settlement officially since 21 May 1085.

Scanian lands and was met by a delegation led by the bishop of the Diocese of Lund, Peder Winstrup. At that time the town had a population of barely 1,000 people.[7]

Its situation on a conflict-ridden border caused problems for Helsingborg. Denmark recaptured

Battle of Helsingborg was fought on 10 March just outside the city, which was badly affected. It took a long time to recover; even in 1770 the city had only 1,321 inhabitants and was still growing slowly.[7]

On 20 October 1811,

crown prince-elect of Sweden (later King Charles XIV John) took his first step on Swedish soil in Helsingborg on his journey from Paris to Stockholm.[8]

From the middle of the 19th century onwards, Helsingborg was one of the fastest-growing cities of Sweden, increasing its population from 4,000 in 1850 to 20,000 in 1890 and 56,000 in 1930 due to industrialization.[

tramway network was inaugurated in 1903 and closed down in 1967.[citation needed
]

Following the Swedish orthography reform of 1906, the spelling of many place names in Sweden was modernized. In 1912, it was decided to use the form Hälsingborg. In preparation for the local government reform in 1971, Hälsingborg city council proposed that the new, enlarged municipality should be spelled Helsingborg; this form was adopted by the government of Sweden from 1 January 1971.

In

underground railroad of sorts, moving Jews away from the closely watched Copenhagen docks to spots farther away, especially Helsingør, just two miles across the Øresund from Helsingborg. Hundreds of civilians hid their fellow Danish citizens—Jews—in their houses, farm lofts and churches until they could board them onto Danish fishing boats, personal pleasure boats and ferry boats. In the span of three nights, Danes had smuggled over 7200 Jews and 680 non-Jews (gentile family members of Jews or political activists) across the Øresund, to safety in Sweden, with one of the main destinations at Helsingborg.[9]

Climate

Helsingborg has an

meteorological winter with both January and February averaging just above the freezing point in terms of mean temperatures. Summers are warm and comparatively long by Swedish standards, with summer arriving earlier and fall later than virtually all areas of Sweden, aside from other parts of Skåne. Helsingborg & nearby surroundings also have a history with being hit by tornadoes.[10] On 8 August 1947, a High-end F1/T3 Tornado hit the Ramlösa district of Helsingborg, causing moderate damage to a farm. Greenhouses were damaged or destroyed, a stall sustained deroofing, a shed were blown away & a tree were snapped.[11] On 16 August 2007, downtown Helsingborg were impacted by an F1 Tornado, damaging a school & snapping trees.[12][13] On 22 June 2014, a Waterspout was observed outside Helsingborg.[14][15] On 27 August 2018, the Eskilsminne district of Helsingborg were hit by an F0 Tornado. Some roofs sustained minor damage.[16][17][18]

Climate data for Helsingborg (2002–2022 averages), extremes since 1948
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 11.0
(51.8)
15.3
(59.5)
18.0
(64.4)
26.0
(78.8)
28.1
(82.6)
30.9
(87.6)
33.2
(91.8)
32.4
(90.3)
27.5
(81.5)
22.5
(72.5)
16.6
(61.9)
12.0
(53.6)
33.2
(91.8)
Mean maximum °C (°F) 8.0
(46.4)
8.6
(47.5)
14.0
(57.2)
19.3
(66.7)
24.7
(76.5)
27.5
(81.5)
29.4
(84.9)
28.4
(83.1)
23.7
(74.7)
17.5
(63.5)
12.5
(54.5)
9.0
(48.2)
30.1
(86.2)
Mean daily maximum °C (°F) 3.0
(37.4)
3.3
(37.9)
6.9
(44.4)
12.5
(54.5)
17.1
(62.8)
20.7
(69.3)
22.8
(73.0)
22.3
(72.1)
18.3
(64.9)
12.6
(54.7)
7.9
(46.2)
4.4
(39.9)
12.7
(54.8)
Daily mean °C (°F) 0.8
(33.4)
0.5
(32.9)
3.4
(38.1)
7.9
(46.2)
13.3
(55.9)
16.0
(60.8)
18.1
(64.6)
17.7
(63.9)
14.4
(57.9)
9.6
(49.3)
5.8
(42.4)
2.4
(36.3)
9.2
(48.5)
Mean daily minimum °C (°F) −1.4
(29.5)
−1.3
(29.7)
−0.1
(31.8)
3.2
(37.8)
7.5
(45.5)
11.2
(52.2)
13.4
(56.1)
13.4
(56.1)
10.5
(50.9)
6.5
(43.7)
3.6
(38.5)
0.4
(32.7)
5.6
(42.0)
Mean minimum °C (°F) −10.3
(13.5)
−8.9
(16.0)
−6.9
(19.6)
−2.8
(27.0)
1.1
(34.0)
6.1
(43.0)
9.0
(48.2)
8.1
(46.6)
4.2
(39.6)
−1.2
(29.8)
−4.6
(23.7)
−7.6
(18.3)
−12.8
(9.0)
Record low °C (°F) −21.7
(−7.1)
−20.5
(−4.9)
−18.8
(−1.8)
−8.7
(16.3)
−1.5
(29.3)
3.0
(37.4)
4.4
(39.9)
5.4
(41.7)
−0.1
(31.8)
−7.3
(18.9)
−10.3
(13.5)
−22.0
(−7.6)
−22.0
(−7.6)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 52.1
(2.05)
43.8
(1.72)
37.0
(1.46)
27.5
(1.08)
49.5
(1.95)
67.2
(2.65)
72.0
(2.83)
87.0
(3.43)
51.2
(2.02)
69.8
(2.75)
55.3
(2.18)
60.5
(2.38)
672.9
(26.5)
Source 1: SMHI Open Data[19]
Source 2: SMHI Monthly Data 2002–2022[20]

Demographics

113,816 live in the city of Helsingborg as of 2020, up from 104,250 inhabitants in 2015.

ninth-largest
in Sweden.

Subdivisions

The City of Helsingborg is subdivided into 31 districts.

The districts of Helsingborg (Classification and census from 9 January 2006)
1 Norr (3600) 12 Centrum (3347) 22 Närlunda (1125) Map of the districts of Helsingborg
2 Mariastaden (2302) 13 Eneborg (3816) 23 Eskilsminne (1835)
3 Ringstorp (2802) 14 Wilson Park (1988) 24 Gustavslund (2772)
4 Berga (1720) 15 Rosengården (4388) 25 Planteringen (2663)
5 Drottninghög (2708) 16 Husensjö (1564) 26 Elineberg (2115)
6 Dalhem (4530) 17 Sofieberg (1606) 27 Ramlösa (4593)
7* Tågaborg (7113) 18 Adolfsberg (4319) 28 Miatorp (2406)
8 Stattena (2549) 19 Söder (3665) 29 Högasten (1034)
9 Fredriksdal (4202) 20 Högaborg (4017) 30 Ättekulla (3274)
10 Slottshöjden (3621) 21 Fältabacken (930) 31
Råå
(3021)
11 Olympia (1843)

Economy

Industry

Helsingborg is a major regional centre of trade, transport and business. In 2001

University of Lund, opened in the former Tretorn rubber factory buildings, founded by Henry Dunker
. Three ferry companies take people and cargo to and from Denmark around the clock. The route is popular with day-trippers going to Helsingør or Copenhagen, or simply enjoying the views from the ferries.[citation needed] IKEA, the retailer of furniture and home interiors, has its international corporate headquarters in Helsingborg. Nicorette, the nicotine chewing gum, has a manufacturing plant there.[citation needed] Ramlösa is a mineral water from Ramlösa Brunn, a southern suburb of the city. Mobile phone developer Spectronic is also situated in Helsingborg. The online custom clothing retailer Tailor Store Sweden AB has its offices in Helsingborg. Zoégas, a major coffee company, has been located here since the 1800s.[21]

Cuisine

The beverage espresso and tonic first appeared on a menu in the city, at the coffeehouse Koppi Roasters in 2007.[22][23]

Sports

The following sports clubs are located in Helsingborg:

The Professional Bowlers Association (PBA) and World Bowling Tour (WBT) have jointly hosted a ten-pin bowling event in Sweden since 2017 called the Lucky Larsen Masters. Olympia Bowling in Helsingborg hosted the event in 2019, and is scheduled to host again in September 2023.[24]

Notable people

Sights

  • Helsingborg waterfront
    Helsingborg waterfront
  • The northern harbour for yachts in Helsingborg
    The northern harbour for yachts in Helsingborg
  • The Helsingborg city hall
    The Helsingborg city hall
  • Steps leading to Kärnan, central Helsingborg, close by the water front.
    Steps leading to Kärnan, central Helsingborg, close by the water front.
  • The Church of Saint Mary, central Helsingborg
    The Church of Saint Mary, central Helsingborg
  • Brunnsparkshotellet, Ramlösa
    Brunnsparkshotellet, Ramlösa
  • Ramlösa mineral water, old spring from 1707
    Ramlösa mineral water, old spring from 1707
  • The ferry Hamlet on the Öresund between Helsingborg and Helsingør
    The ferry Hamlet on the Öresund between Helsingborg and Helsingør
  • Kärnan, the medieval tower
    Kärnan, the medieval tower
  • View over Helsingborg from Kärnan
    View over Helsingborg from Kärnan
  • View over Helsingborg from Kärnan
    View over Helsingborg from Kärnan
  • Jørn Utzon's Elineberg Housing development
    Jørn Utzon's Elineberg Housing development
  • Swimming baths and sauna, Pålsjöbaden
    Swimming baths and sauna, Pålsjöbaden

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Localities 2018; population, land area, population density". Statistics Sweden. 23 March 2021. Archived from the original on 5 August 2020. Retrieved 4 June 2021.
  2. ^ "Helsingborg". The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.). HarperCollins. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  3. ^ "Helsingborg", "Hälsingborg" (US) and "Helsingborg". Lexico UK English Dictionary. Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 30 December 2019.
  4. ^ "Helsingborg". Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary. Retrieved 2 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Helsingborgs stad – History of Helsingborg". Helsingborg.se. 21 May 2007. Archived from the original on 8 August 2007. Retrieved 30 July 2010.
  6. ^ a b "CyberCity / Helsingborg / Befolkning". .historia.su.se. 14 January 2008. Archived from the original on 15 November 2004. Retrieved 30 July 2010.
  7. ^ "Helsingborgs stad – Bernadotte jubileum 2010". Helsingborg.se. 12 April 2010. Retrieved 30 July 2010.[permanent dead link]
  8. ^ Streit, Katie. "Rescue of the Danish Jews: Evacuation & Effects". study.com. Archived from the original on 24 November 2018. Retrieved 24 November 2018.
  9. ^ "European Severe Weather Database". Archived from the original on 18 December 2020. Retrieved 3 October 2023.
  10. ^ "European Severe Weather Database". Archived from the original on 3 October 2023.
  11. ^ "European Severe Weather Database". Archived from the original on 3 October 2023.
  12. ^ "Tromb mitt i stan slet ner tak". 16 August 2007. Archived from the original on 3 October 2023. Retrieved 3 October 2023.
  13. ^ "European Severe Weather Database". Archived from the original on 3 October 2023.
  14. ^ "Tromb över Sundet - hd.se". Archived from the original on 26 August 2014.
  15. ^ "European Severe Weather Database". Archived from the original on 3 October 2023.
  16. ^ "Tromber och fallvindar i Sverige 2015-2019 | SMHI". Archived from the original on 28 May 2023. Retrieved 3 October 2023.
  17. ^ "Misstänkt tromb lyfte studsmattor på Eskilsminne". 27 August 2018. Archived from the original on 15 February 2023. Retrieved 3 October 2023.
  18. ^ "Ladda ner meteorologiska observationer". Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (in Swedish). Archived from the original on 11 April 2019. Retrieved 10 February 2023.
  19. ^ "Års- och månadsstatistik". Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (in Swedish). 10 February 2023. Archived from the original on 25 December 2018. Retrieved 27 February 2016.
  20. ^ "Zoégas – Om Zoégas". zoegas.se. 12 May 2015. Archived from the original on 18 May 2015. Retrieved 12 May 2015.
  21. ^ "Deep Dive: What Is an Espresso Tonic? | Trade Coffee". www.drinktrade.com. Archived from the original on 1 June 2023. Retrieved 19 November 2023.
  22. ^ Strand, Oliver (19 November 2023). "Coffee Drinks Stake a Claim at the Bar - The New York Times". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 19 November 2023. Retrieved 19 November 2023.{{cite news}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  23. ^ "2023 PBA Tour Schedule". pba.com. 29 January 2023. Archived from the original on 9 February 2023. Retrieved 22 May 2023.

External links