K-Meleon

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

K-Meleon
Developer(s)Christophe Thibault, Sebastian Spaeth, Brian Harris, Jeff Doozan, Mark Liffiton, Rob Johnson, Ulf Erikson, Jordan Callicoat, Dorian Boissonnade, Roy Tam, et al.[1][2]
Initial releaseAugust 21, 2000; 23 years ago (2000-08-21)
Stable release
76.4.7[3] Edit this on Wikidata / 7 April 2023; 15 months ago (7 April 2023)
Repository
Written in
Atom
Available in7 languages
TypeWeb browser
LicenseGPL
Websitekmeleonbrowser.org Edit this at Wikidata

K-Meleon is a free and open-source, lightweight web browser for Microsoft Windows. It uses the native Windows API to create its user interface. Early versions of K-Meleon rendered web pages with Gecko, Mozilla's browser layout engine, which Mozilla's browser Firefox and its email client Thunderbird also use. K-Meleon became a popular Windows browser and was available as an optional default browser in Europe via BrowserChoice.eu. K-Meleon continued to use Gecko for several years after Mozilla deprecated embedding it. Current versions of K-Meleon use the Goanna layout engine, a fork of Gecko created for the browser Pale Moon.

K-Meleon began with the goal of being faster and lighter than Mozilla's original internet suite. Until 2011, K-Meleon embedded Gecko in a stripped-down interface. Throughout its lifespan, K-Meleon has required small amounts of random-access memory (RAM). K-Meleon 76 supports discontinued versions of Windows such as Windows XP and Windows Vista. Mozilla no longer supports these platforms after their Firefox Quantum rewrite.

Customization is another primary design goal. Users can change the

configuration files. K-Meleon supports macros, which are small browser extensions that users can examine, write, or edit in a text editor
. K-Meleon's custom configuration files can trigger macros. Reviews describe the customization features as versatile but intimidating to the average user. Due to its adaptability, K-Meleon was recommended for internet cafes and libraries in the early 2000s.

History

Christophe Thibault started the K-Meleon project in the 2000s,[4] when many new browsers were launched.[5] To open-source their once-dominant Netscape Communicator internet suite, Netscape founded the Mozilla project.[6] K-Meleon was one of several browsers to use Mozilla's browser engine Gecko.[7] Thibault designed K-Meleon to combine Gecko with native Windows interface elements, an approach that was less resource-intensive and allowed the browser to blend into its environment.[8]

Embedding Gecko

Screenshot of K-Meleon with a right-click menu
K-Meleon 0.2

Christophe Thibault released K-Meleon 0.1 on August 21, 2000.[9] While working at Nullsoft,[10] Thibault said he created the first simple release to attract attention, during a day off.[11][4] For the 0.2 release, he implemented features like context menus and moved development to SourceForge to welcome contributions from open-source developers.[12]

Thibault handed the project over to new developers,

cookie management.[15] These releases introduced text-based configuration files called configs that allowed users to customize the browser or hide interface elements,[16][17] and a macro language to extend the browser.[18][19] Early reviews described K-Meleon as small, fast, limited, and visually similar to Internet Explorer.[4][9][10]

K-Meleon was built with open-source code from Mozilla but its narrower focus offered advantages over the Mozilla Application Suite,

alpha release.[24] Mozilla created user interfaces via their cross-platform XML User Interface Language (XUL) layer.[25] This technology used Gecko to lay out application interfaces.[7] XUL allowed Mozilla to build one application for multiple operating systems but generated graphical controls that did not match the rest of the system.[26] K-Meleon was smaller and more closely integrated into the Windows desktop than Mozilla's browser, and could use the native bookmarking system to access Internet Explorer's favorites.[9][a]

Screenshot of K-Meleon with a popup box that reads Hello World
K-Meleon 0.7 with a simple "Hello World" macro, the optional Tango theme, and several NPAPI plugins installed

K-Meleon 0.7 was released with the Mozilla 1.0 engine in October 2002.[27] Despite AOL disbanding upstream parent company Netscape in 2003, the development of K-Meleon continued. Mozilla continued work on Gecko, and K-Meleon was updated with service packs and version 0.8.[28] In 2005, Ulf Erikson announced version 0.9 would be the final version of K-Meleon he would build. He was the project's developer but stated he was no longer using K-Meleon as his primary browser after moving to Linux.[29] In January 2006, Dorian Boissonnade became the lead developer and began working towards a 1.0 release.[30][31]

K-Meleon 1.0 was released in July 2006 and made the browser fully translatable.[b] It stored localizations in separate library-and-config files within existing K-Meleon installations. Parts of the browser could be translated in a text editor.[33] K-Meleon 1.0 maintained support for its existing system of text-based configuration files and introduced a new graphical interface to change preferences from within the browser.[34][31]

Version 1.1 expanded the macro system. Earlier versions placed all of the macros into a single config file. Initial releases came with fewer than 50 lines of macro code and instructions for end users to create their own macros.[35] Later versions came with over 1,000 lines of macro code, and the macros users wrote and shared online. In response, K-Meleon developers separated macros into modules.[36][35] Version 1.5 introduced a true tabbed interface.[31][c]

In Europe, version 1.5 was an optional default Windows browser through Microsoft's browser ballot. Due to accusations of abusing its market position to promote Internet Explorer, Microsoft introduced a browser ballot in the European Economic Area (EEA).[38] By 2010, it offered Windows users a choice of the 12 most popular web browsers, including K-Meleon.[39]

7x releases

In 2011, Mozilla ended support for embedding the Gecko layout engine; because K-Meleon had previously relied on this API, the browser's future became uncertain.[40][d] In 2013, after years without an official, stable release, the K-Meleon group began developing version 74.[31] While Mozilla had ended support for embedding of Gecko, it maintained a technology called XULRunner.[45] XULRunner was a stand-alone implementation of the Gecko engine designed to launch applications.[46] K-Meleon 74 used XULRunner instead of Mozilla's deprecated embedding software.[47][31] Outside the new engine, version 74 brought small improvements, including better CPU use and minor bug fixes.[48]

K-Meleon 75 included a

spelling checker, form auto-completion, and a new skin system.[49][50] Boissonnade began work on version 76 but suffered a hard disk drive failure during beta testing.[51]

Goanna branch

Two screenshots of K-Meleon with different appearances drawn from the windows theme
Two screenshots of K-Meleon 76 with the same K-Meleon theme but different system themes

Active development on K-Meleon takes place using Goanna,[52] a fork of Gecko created for the browser Pale Moon.[53] With Firefox Quantum, Mozilla rewrote large parts of its browser engine.[54] In 2017, Roy Tam forked K-Meleon 76 to run on Goanna.[55] The project's former lead developer Boissonnade wrote; "Thanks for taking care of that little lizard [after I] left it".[56] K-Meleon on Goanna remains compatible with deprecated versions of Windows and can run with smaller amounts of RAM than those required by mainstream web browsers.[19] K-Meleon has lower memory requirements than other low-resource browsers.[57]

K-Meleon is updated on a rolling release schedule.[58] By default, the browser is a multi-lingual portable application that can directly run from the host computer or removable media.[59] It is also included in the PortableApps.com repository.[60]

Customization

Customization of K-Meleon's interface is possible using text-format configuration files called configs.

keyboard shortcuts, and more can all be customized via K-Meleon's configuration files.[61][62] These configs can call upon macros,[63] a type of extension that can be opened in a text editor.[36]

A simple "Hello, World!" program could be written in K-Meleon's macro language that would pop up a small window with the message "Hello world!".[64]

HelloWorld{
        alert("Hello world!");
}

To trigger the macro, a keyboard accelerator could be created by adding the code below to the accelerator config, causing the macro to launch if the Ctrl, Alt, and H keys are pressed at the same time.[63]

CTRL ALT H = macros(HelloWorld)

Custom toolbars offer more options, but the syntax is similar. The example below would create a new toolbar with a button to trigger a macro.[65]

NewToolbar{
   !NewButton{
	   macros(HelloWorld)
   }
}

This combination of configs and macro modules provides control over much of the browser.[66] It also creates a learning curve for customization that is not present in most browsers. A CNET review criticized K-Meleon because it "requires some knowledge of computer code to get the most out of it".[67] Popular browsers use systems like WebExtensions, where there is a separation between users and extension developers.[68][69]

Because of its flexibility, K-Meleon was useful for environments in which the browser needed to be customized for public use, such as libraries and internet cafés.[70] It allowed administrators to hide some features from patrons.[71] For example, a library could hide interface elements like the address bar or limit the computer's access to an online resource like the library catalog.[17]

Legacy Windows versions

K-Meleon supports a range of legacy software and hardware.

Windows Embedded POSReady 2009 variant have been unsupported since 2019.[74][e] The latest major browser releases to support these operating systems are Microsoft's Internet Explorer 8 (2014),[76] Google Chrome 49.0.2623.112 (2016),[77] and Mozilla Firefox 52.9.0 (2018).[78]

Web browsers cannot access secure websites if they do not support

Windows 9X receive occasional updates for TLS certificates.[19] K-Meleon 74 can access secure websites on Windows 2000 using an old version of the Goanna engine combined with up-to-date ciphers.[82] K-Meleon 1.5 can run on Windows 95, Windows 98, and Windows Me.[83] Occasional TLS updates allow version 1.5 to access secure websites.[84]

Release history

K-Meleon, which was first released in 2000, has been under development for over 20 years and is still maintained. The most-recent version K-Meleon 76 is updated on a rolling release schedule. All versions of K-Meleon are written for Microsoft Windows operating systems.[g]

Complete K-Meleon release history
Version Initial Release Latest Update Gecko Version Notes
0.1 Aug 21, 2000 Aug 21, 2000 M17 [4]
0.2 Nov 26, 2000 Jan 29, 2001 M18 [note 1][85][86]
0.3 Feb 13, 2001 Feb 13, 2001 0.8 [note 2][87]
0.4 May 11, 2001 May 11, 2001 0.9 [note 3][88]
0.5 Sep 27, 2001 Sep 27, 2001 0.9.4 [89]
0.6 Oct 30, 2001 Oct 30, 2001 0.9.5 [90]
0.7 Oct 31, 2002 Feb 12, 2003 1.2b [note 4][91][92]
0.8 Nov 10, 2003 Dec 23, 2003 1.5 [93][94]
0.9 Jan 18, 2005 Apr 25, 2006 1.7.13 [note 5][95][96]
1.0 Jul 15, 2006 Sep 22, 2006 1.8.0.7 [note 6][97][98]
1.1 May 22, 2007 Jul 18, 2008 1.8.1.17 [note 7][99]
1.5 Aug 8, 2008 Dec 9, 2022 1.8.1.24 [note 8][100][101]
1.6 Nov 14, 2010 Dec 12, 2010 1.9.1.20 [102][103]
74.0 Sep 8, 2014 Aug 14, 2021 24.7 [note 9][104][82]
75.0 Nov 25, 2014 Jun 24, 2015 31.5 [note 10][105][106]
75.1 Sep 19, 2015 Dec 14, 2022 31.8 [107][108]
76.0 May 2, 2016 Dec 20, 2016 38.8 [109]
76.G Nov 28, 2017 Dec 15, 2018 Goanna [note 11][110]
76.2.G Jan 10, 2019 Aug 22, 2020 Goanna [111]
76.3.G Aug 29, 2020 Feb 5, 2021 Goanna [112]
76.4.G Feb 12, 2021 Apr 7, 2023 Goanna [113]
Notes
  1. ^ Version 0.2 is the first version hosted at SourceForge and introduced right-click context menus.
  2. ^ Version 0.3 is a rewrite using MfcEmbed instead of WinEmbed and the BCG Library. It introduced Kplugin support for menus and toolbars, a preferences dialog, customizable menus and accelerator keys, basic authentication, page source view, and the option to save files to disk.
  3. ^ Version 0.4 introduced support for Netscape bookmarks, full-screen display, the macro extension Kplugin, the history Kplugin, icons in menus, cache support, configurable cookie and image settings, and the option to disable Java and JavaScript.
  4. ^ Version 0.7 introduced layered windows for "tabbed browsing", support for Opera bookmarks, automatic detection of popular third-party (NPAPI) plugins, text zoom, print preview, page setup, type ahead find, and skin support.
  5. ^ Version 0.9 introduced the Privacy Kplugin, the Flashblock extension, an RSS feed reader, and a new default skin (Phoenity). It was updated with community-driven Gecko updates.
  6. Atom
    feed reader (NewsFox).
  7. ^ Version 1.1 expanded multi-language support. It introduced several official localizations, modular macros, the session saver Kplugin, new customization of search engines and mouse gestures, multi-user configuration files, Gecko updates, and the update checker Kplugin.
  8. ^ Version 1.5 replaced the native preferences panel with the XUL-based former advanced preferences panel. It introduced true tabs instead of layered windows, new configuration options, a Unicode build for Windows NT, a non-Unicode build for Windows 9X, and Gecko updates.
  9. ^ Version 74 transitioned away from embedding Gecko to update the browser engine. The jump in version number is related to K-Meleon's user agent string.
  10. ^ Version 75 introduced Gecko updates, an expanded JSBridge, an expanded macro language, support for "about:" pages, new spellcheck features, and a shorter privacy bar using text. It enabled the container for Adobe Flash by default.
  11. ^ Version 76 on Goanna is a new branch that switched from Gecko to Goanna.

General references for this table include K-Meleon file releases,[114] release notes,[115] changelogs,[50] and the Announcements forum.[116]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ This approach of embedding Gecko into a native interface was also used by Camino on macOS.[7]
  2. open-source. The source code could be downloaded, the source files translated, the browser code recompiled, and the resulting application distributed under an open-source license.[32]
  3. ^ Previously used in unofficial builds, true tabs supported drag and drop, could have individual close icons, and could be placed on the bottom of the window.[37]
  4. backend. GNOME Web developer Christian Persch described Mozilla's support for embedding of Gecko on Linux as "unmaintained and stagnant".[44]
  5. ^ ReactOS, the open-source implementation of Windows, only targets compatibility up to the discontinued Windows Server 2003.[75]
  6. ^ Popular browsers like Chrome, Edge, Safari, and Internet Explorer rely on the operating system for client certificates. Mozilla software can use client certificates directly from the browser.[81]
  7. ^ K-Meleon can run on POSIX-compliant systems if they have an implementation of the Windows API like the Wine compatibility layer.[72]

References

  1. ^ a b Erikson, Ulf; Holman; Mutch; Moses; Sachner; Zarneth (2002). "§ 8.1 Acknowledgements". K-Meleon User's Guide and Reference Manual. K-Meleon Documentation Project. Archived from the original on August 25, 2007. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  2. ^ "About K-Meleon" (Credits for K-Meleon 76). K-Meleon Project. 2017.
  3. ^ "K-Meleon 76.4.7 on Goanna 3.5.0". April 7, 2023.
  4. ^ a b c d Mook, Nate (August 22, 2000). "K-Meleon Browser Showcases Gecko". BetaNews. BetaNews, Inc. Archived from the original on February 9, 2009. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  5. ^ McCracken, Harry (March 2007). "For Browsers, the Best of Times is Now". PC World. International Data Group. p. 15.
  6. ^ Dunsdon, Nicole (October 11, 2000). "Rebel Web browsers worth considering". Calgary Herald. p. TB4.
  7. ^ a b c Boswell, David; King, Brian; Oeschger, Ian; Collins, Pete; Murhpy, Eric (September 24, 2002). "Mozilla as Platform". In Boswell, David (ed.). Creating Applications with Mozilla. O'Reilly Media. p. 7. Archived from the original on February 2, 2023. Retrieved February 2, 2023.
  8. ^ a b Blanco, Elena (March 1, 2005). "Open source and the web browser". OSS Watch. University of Oxford. Archived from the original on May 29, 2010. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  9. ^
    ZDNet. ZDNet News. Archived from the original
    on November 8, 2001. Retrieved March 5, 2022.
  10. ^ a b Antonin, Billet (August 24, 2000). "K-Meleon, un Internet Explorer en code libre" [K-Meleon, an open-source Internet Explorer]. 01net (in French). Retrieved August 23, 2023.
  11. ^ Jarkoff, Scott (August 22, 2000). "K-Meleon Owns Netscape's Gecko". Dimension Music. Lynx Technology Group. Archived from the original on January 8, 2001. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  12. ^ Mook, Nate (2001). "K-Meleon Makes Second Appearance". BetaNews. BetaNews, Inc. Archived from the original on March 15, 2023. Retrieved March 14, 2023.
  13. ^ Spaeth, Sebastian (February 13, 2001). "Release Notes". SourceForge. Archived from the original on August 16, 2001. Retrieved January 14, 2023.
  14. ^ Harris, Brian (January 31, 2001). "Re:News". [email protected] (Mailing list). Archived from the original on November 27, 2002.
  15. ^ a b Blasko, Larry (December 6, 2001). "K-Meleon: Lean, mean Web browser". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 18, 2022. Retrieved March 14, 2022.
  16. ^ Erikson, Ulf; Holman; Mutch; Moses; Sachner; Zarneth (2002). "§ 4.6 Configs". K-Meleon User's Guide and Reference Manual. K-Meleon Documentation Project. Archived from the original on May 21, 2018. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  17. ^ a b c Mutch, Andrew; Ventura, Karen (July 15, 2002). "Does Your Library Need a Different Browser?". NetConnect. Library Journal. Archived from the original on October 11, 2007.
  18. ^ Doozan, Jeff (March 31, 2001). "New plugin allows users to define macros". [email protected] (Mailing list). Archived from the original on November 27, 2002.
  19. ^ a b c d Shareef, Tashreef (March 30, 2022). "The 7 Best Browsers for Old and Low-End Computers". MakeUseOf.com. MUO. Archived from the original on August 13, 2022. Retrieved August 13, 2022.
  20. ^ Mackey, Kurt; Aeirould (July 31, 2002). "Mozilla Milestone 1.0: the Review". Ars Technica. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on December 17, 2002. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  21. ^ SeaMonkey Council. "The SeaMonkey Project". Seamonkey-project.org. Archived from the original on December 6, 2020. Retrieved July 17, 2013.
  22. ^ Orlowski, Andrew (November 26, 2001). "Galeon zips while Mozilla slips". The Register. Situation Publishing. Archived from the original on September 10, 2022. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  23. ^ Boswell, David. "Mozilla Browsers". O'Reilly Media. Archived from the original on June 7, 2014. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  24. ^ Olsen, Stephanie (September 25, 2002). "Mozilla browser gets some bite". CNET. CNET Networks. Archived from the original on September 10, 2022. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  25. ^ Collins, Scott. "Ars Technica sits down with Scott Collins from Mozilla.org". Ars Technica (Interview). Interviewed by Jorge O. Castro. p. 2. Archived from the original on February 3, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  26. ^ Mackey, Kurt; Aeirould (July 31, 2002). "Mozilla Milestone 1.0: the Review". Ars Technica. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on December 8, 2002. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  27. ^ Boswell, David. "Independent Status Reports". MozillaZine. Archived from the original on January 5, 2003. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  28. ^ "MozillaZine Review of the Year 2003". MozillaZine. December 31, 2003. Archived from the original on January 1, 2023. Retrieved January 1, 2023.
  29. ^ Erikson, Ulf (January 8, 2005). "K-Meleon: Dead or Alive?". [email protected] (Mailing list). Archived from the original on December 18, 2022. Retrieved September 17, 2022.
  30. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (January 16, 2006). "Future K-Meleon 1.0". [email protected] (Mailing list). Archived from the original on June 10, 2006. Retrieved September 17, 2022. Quoted by co-developer Hao Jiang: "[Kmeleon-dev] Future K-Meleon 1.0". Archived from the original on December 29, 2022.
  31. ^ a b c d e Asián, Arantxa (June 9, 2014). "Cinco navegadores web alternativos que deberías probar alguna vez" [Five alternative web browsers that you should try out sometime] (in Spanish). Total Publishing Network S.A. Archived from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2023.
  32. ^ Pogson, Geoff (December 28, 2004). "Computing in Welsh". Multilingual Computing & Technology. Vol. 16, no. 69. MultiLingual Media LLC. pp. 37–40.
  33. ^ Kohler, Klaus (May 14, 2007). "How to localize K-Meleon's menus, macros and toolbars". K-Meleon 1.x Reference. Archived from the original on May 28, 2007. Retrieved February 9, 2023.
  34. ^ Karaboychev, Kalin (July 14, 2008). "K-Meleon – инсталация и настройки". Kaldata (in Bulgarian). Kaldeita Kom EOOD. Archived from the original on December 31, 2022. Retrieved December 31, 2022. (Refer to the visual tour of the "Advanced Preferences" panel.)
  35. ^ a b Kohler, Klaus (May 9, 2007). "What's new?". K-Meleon 1.x Reference. Archived from the original on September 24, 2009. Retrieved February 9, 2023.
  36. ^ a b "K-Meleon Macro Module". FileInfo – The File Extensions Database. Sharpened Productions. August 12, 2009. Archived from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2023.
  37. ^ Wang, Mao (August 23, 2009). "快速网页浏览器K-MeleonCCF ME 0.094版". MyDrivers.com. 驱动之家. Archived from the original on December 23, 2022. Retrieved December 23, 2022. K-MeleonCCF是一个非官方K-Meleon版本,源自K-Meleon 1.0 branch。最新CCF版与最新K-Meleon 官方版间最大的不同在于CCF版支持"real tab structure"(由Dorian开发)。[...] K-MeleonCCF ME 0.09版本的标签上可以显示关闭按钮, 标签栏可以置于窗口的下方。 [K-MeleonCCF is an unofficial K-Meleon version that comes from the K-Meleon 1.0 branch. The biggest difference between the latest CCF version and the latest K-Meleon official version is that the CCF version supports "true tab structure" (developed by Dorian). [...] K-MeleonCCF ME version 0.09 can display a close button on each tab, and the tab bar can be placed at the bottom of the window.]
  38. ^ Schofield, Jack (December 16, 2009). "EU drops Microsoft browser charges with agreement on 'ballot screen'". The Guardian. Archived from the original on December 19, 2009. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  39. ^ Cellan-Jones, Rory (March 1, 2010). "Microsoft offers browser choices to Europeans". BBC. Archived from the original on August 30, 2018. Retrieved September 9, 2022.
  40. Heise Media. Archived
    from the original on November 13, 2012. Retrieved September 10, 2016.
  41. ^ Foresman, Chris (April 1, 2011). "WebKit best option for Camino as Mozilla drops Gecko embedding". Ars Technica. Condé Nast. Archived from the original on December 22, 2022. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  42. ^ Murphy, David (June 1, 2013). "Mac 'Camino' Web Browser Gets Put Out to Pasture". PC Magazine. Ziff Davis. Archived from the original on December 22, 2022. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  43. ^ Feller, Stephen (December 7, 2005). "Galeon, Epiphany ready for a reunion". Linux.com. The Linux Foundation. Archived from the original on March 20, 2023. Retrieved March 20, 2023.
  44. ^ Persch, Chris (April 1, 2008). "ANNOUNCEMENT: The Future of Epiphany". Gnome Development Announcements List (Mailing list). GNOME Project. Archived from the original on August 22, 2022. Retrieved August 28, 2022.
  45. .
  46. ^ Feldt, Kenneth (February 9, 2009). Programming Firefox. O'Reilly Media. p. 374. XULRunner is a deployment method that uses the stand-alone Gecko runtime engine (also known as XULRunner) to launch XUL applications.
  47. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (November 3, 2013). "Anyone still using kmeleon?". Archived from the original on September 13, 2022. Retrieved September 10, 2016.
  48. ^ Tur, Henryk (March 6, 2014). "K-Meleon 74 beta 4". PC World (in Polish). International Data Group. Archived from the original on December 31, 2022. Retrieved December 30, 2022.
  49. ^ Serea, Razvan (November 26, 2014). "K-Meleon 75 Beta 1". Neowin. Neowin LLC. Archived from the original on December 22, 2022. Retrieved December 21, 2022.
  50. ^ a b Boissonnade, Dorian. "K-Meleon Changelog". Archived from the original on September 13, 2022. Retrieved August 29, 2022.
  51. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (December 20, 2016). "K-Meleon 76 RC". Archived from the original on December 22, 2022. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  52. ^ López, José María (March 10, 2022). "Navegadores web minimalistas y ligeros para ordenadores viejos" [Minimalist and Lightweight Web Browsers for Old Computers]. hipertextual (in Spanish). Hipertextual SL. Archived from the original on August 29, 2022. Retrieved August 29, 2022.
  53. ^ Peers, Nick (2016). "Pale Moon adopts new Goanna browser engine, fine-tunes interface". BetaNews. BetaNews, Inc. Archived from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 17, 2023.
  54. ^ Mossberg, Walt (January 26, 2017). "What's up with Firefox, the browser that time forgot?". The Verge. Archived from the original on December 19, 2022. Retrieved December 19, 2022.
  55. ^ Roy Tam (November 28, 2017). "K-Meleon 76 on Goanna 3.4.2". Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 19, 2023.
  56. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (December 10, 2017). "[TEST BUILD] K-Meleon 76 on Goanna 3.4.1". Archived from the original on September 10, 2022. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  57. ^ Stanojevic, Milan (November 1, 2022). "Which Browser Uses the Least RAM?". Archived from the original on January 30, 2023. Retrieved January 30, 2023.
  58. ^ Roy Tam (2023). "K-Meleon 76.4.7 on Goanna 3.5.0". Archived from the original on May 17, 2022. Retrieved January 5, 2023.
  59. ^ García, Rocío (March 9, 2022). "Sin instalación y para llevar: Los mejores programas portables" (in Spanish). Archived from the original on September 4, 2022. Retrieved September 3, 2022.
  60. ^ Haller, John (August 8, 2022). "K-Meleon Portable 76.4.6-2022-08-06 (lightweight, customizable browser) Released". Archived from the original on December 19, 2022. Retrieved December 19, 2022.
  61. ^ Geere, Duncan (March 1, 2010). "Wild Wild Web – the browser ballot's lesser-known options". Pocket-lint. Archived from the original on September 10, 2022. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  62. ^ Kohler, Klaus (November 27, 2006). "Configuration Files". K-Meleon 1.x Reference. Archived from the original on September 23, 2009. Retrieved February 9, 2023.
  63. ^ a b Doozan, Jeff (2001). "Macro Definition File for K-Meleon 0.6 (macros.cfg)" (Documentation). K-Meleon. Doozan described the accelerator syntax to add a macro command as "Sample Usage: in accel.cfg KEY = macros(example)" with "example" being the name of an individual macro sections enclosed in brackets.
  64. ^ Erikson, Ulf; Holman; Mutch; Moses; Sachner; Zarneth (2002). "§ 7.7 Macro Language". K-Meleon User's Guide and Reference Manual. K-Meleon Documentation Project. Archived from the original on February 9, 2023. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  65. ^ Doozan, Jeff (2001). "Toolbar Definition File for K-Meleon 0.6 (toolbars.cfg)" (Documentation). K-Meleon. Doozan documents the formatting as "ToolBar Name { Button Name { command id (required) } }" with many optional parameters including size, "Tool Bar(16,16){ = NAME OF TOOLBAR* (WIDTH, HEIGHT), DEFAULT=(16,16)", and bitmap "image file[s]" for various states.
  66. ^ Wayne, Richard (June 2004). "An Overview of Public Access Computer Software Management" (PDF). Computers in Libraries. Information Today. pp. 28–29. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 4, 2022. Retrieved September 4, 2022.
  67. CBS Interactive. Archived
    from the original on September 12, 2022. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  68. ^ "Browser Extensions". MDN Web Docs. Mozilla. Archived from the original on July 19, 2020. Retrieved March 19, 2023.
  69. ^ "Safari web extensions". Apple. Archived from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 21, 2023.
  70. ^ Geere, Duncan (March 1, 2010). "Wild Wild Web – the browser ballot's lesser-known options". Pocket-lint. Archived from the original on September 10, 2022. Retrieved September 10, 2022.
  71. ^ Jesdanun, Anick (June 16, 2002). "Mozilla an adaptable browser". Spartanburg Herald-Journal. Spartanburg, South Carolina: Kevin Drake. pp. E1, E8. Archived from the original on March 20, 2023. Retrieved March 20, 2023.
  72. ^ a b Haller, John (March 8, 2023). "K-Meleon Portable". PortableApps.com. Archived from the original on March 11, 2023. Retrieved March 11, 2023.
  73. ^ "An Inside Look at the Months-long Process of Getting Windows XP Ready for Release to Manufacturing | Stories". Microsoft Stories. Microsoft. August 24, 2001. Archived from the original on August 5, 2019. Retrieved June 24, 2018.
  74. ^ "Microsoft Product Lifecycle Search: Windows Embedded POSReady 2009". Microsoft Support. Microsoft. Archived from the original on October 10, 2014. Retrieved October 13, 2012.
  75. ^ Speed, Richard (March 14, 2022). "ReactOS shows off SMP support in open-source take on Windows". The Register. Archived from the original on December 20, 2022. Retrieved February 2, 2023.
  76. ^ Keizer, Gregg (March 11, 2014). "US-CERT urges XP users to dump IE". Computerworld. IDG. Archived from the original on March 15, 2014. Retrieved April 6, 2014.
  77. ^ "Google Chrome 50 ceases support for XP, Vista and older Oses". Zee Media Corporation. April 15, 2016. Archived from the original on February 24, 2022. Retrieved February 22, 2022.
  78. ZDNet. ZDNet. Archived
    from the original on February 24, 2022. Retrieved February 2, 2022.
  79. ^ "Transport Layer Security (TLS)". Khan Academy. Retrieved August 13, 2023.
  80. ^ Foltýn, Tomáš (September 3, 2018). "Majority of the world's top million websites now use HTTPS". welivesecurity.com. ESET. Archived from the original on December 19, 2022. Retrieved December 19, 2022.
  81. ^ SSL.com Support Team (May 5, 2020). "Configuring Client Authentication Certificates in Web Browsers". SSL.com. Archived from the original on February 9, 2023. Retrieved February 9, 2023.
  82. ^ a b Roy Tam (August 14, 2021). "K-Meleon 74 on Goanna 2.2 (palemoon-26.5) for Win2000". Archived from the original on February 25, 2022. Retrieved December 22, 2022.
  83. Future US, Inc. Archived
    from the original on March 18, 2023. Retrieved March 18, 2023.
  84. ^ Roy Tam (January 8, 2020). "K-Meleon 1.5.x with TLS 1.2 Support version". Archived from the original on February 16, 2022. Retrieved February 23, 2022.
  85. ^ "K-Meleon". Archived from the original on March 31, 2001. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  86. ^ "Release Notes and Changelog, 0.2". Archived from the original on May 19, 2001. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  87. ^ "Release Notes and Changelog, 0.3". SourceForge. February 13, 2001. Archived from the original on August 16, 2001. Retrieved January 14, 2023.
  88. ^ "Release Notes and Changelog, 0.4". Archived from the original on August 31, 2001. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  89. ^ "K-Meleon 0.5 Release Notes". 2001. Archived from the original on December 17, 2001. Retrieved March 3, 2023., Or alternate archived file link: K-Meleon 0.5 Release Notes
  90. ^ "K-Meleon 0.6 Release Notes". 2001. Archived from the original on November 2, 2001. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  91. ^ "K-Meleon 0.7 Release Notes". 2002. Archived from the original on February 19, 2005. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  92. ^ "K-Meleon 0.7 Service Pack 1 Release Notes". Archived from the original on April 7, 2003. Retrieved April 1, 2023.
  93. ^ "K-Meleon 0.8 Release Notes". 2003. Archived from the original on November 21, 2003. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  94. ^ "K-Meleon Files: 0.8.2". December 23, 2003. Retrieved April 1, 2023.
  95. ^ "K-Meleon 0.9 Release Notes". January 18, 2005. Archived from the original on October 6, 2006. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  96. ^ "K-Meleon Files: 0.9.13". April 25, 2006. Retrieved April 1, 2023.
  97. ^ "K-Meleon 1.0 Release Notes". September 27, 2006. Archived from the original on March 6, 2007. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  98. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian. "K-Meleon 1.0". Archived from the original on March 4, 2023. Retrieved March 4, 2023.
  99. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (July 18, 2008). "K-Meleon 1.1.6 and 1.5RC". Archived from the original on March 4, 2023. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  100. ^ Boissonnade, Dorian (August 9, 2008). "K-Meleon 1.5". Archived from the original on March 4, 2023. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  101. ^ Roy Tam (January 8, 2020). "K-Meleon 1.5.x with TLS 1.2 Support version". Archived from the original on February 16, 2022. Retrieved February 23, 2022.
  102. ^ "K-Meleon 1.6.0 Beta is RELEASED!". November 14, 2010. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  103. ^ "K-Meleon 1.6.0 Beta2 is RELEASED!". December 15, 2010. Retrieved April 9, 2023.
  104. ^ "K-Meleon 74 RC 2". September 7, 2014. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  105. ^ "K-Meleon 75 Beta 1". November 24, 2014. Retrieved April 9, 2023.
  106. ^ "K-Meleon 75 Release". June 23, 2015. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  107. ^ "K-Meleon 75.1". September 19, 2015. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  108. ^ Roy Tam (December 14, 2022). "Re: Anyone still using kmeleon?". Retrieved April 1, 2023.
  109. ^ "K-Meleon 76 RC". July 1, 2016. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  110. ^ "K-Meleon 76 on Goanna". July 18, 2019. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  111. ^ "K-Meleon 76.2.1 on Goanna 3.4.6". September 11, 2020. Archived from the original on March 3, 2023. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  112. ^ "K-Meleon 76.3.1 on Goanna 3.4.6". March 14, 2021. Archived from the original on October 12, 2020. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  113. ^ "K-Meleon 76.4 on Goanna 3.4.6". February 25, 2023. Archived from the original on May 17, 2022. Retrieved March 2, 2023.
  114. ^ For versions 0.2–75.1: "K-Meleon SourceForge project file releases". Kmeleon.Sourceforge.net. December 20, 2016. Archived from the original on June 4, 2006. Retrieved November 8, 2011.
  115. ^ For versions 0.2–0.8.2: "File Releases". Archived from the original on June 4, 2006. Retrieved January 6, 2023. (Individual version release notes available under the respective [Notes] link.)
  116. ^ For versions 1.1–76: "K-Meleon: Announcements". Kmeleon.sourceforge.net. Archived from the original on September 13, 2022. Retrieved November 25, 2014.

External links