Germany men's national basketball team

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

Germany
FIBA ranking3 Steady (1 March 2024)[1]
Joined FIBA1934
FIBA zoneFIBA Europe
National federationDeutscher Basketball Bund (DBB)
CoachGordon Herbert
Nickname(s)Die Mannschaft (The Team)
Olympic Games
Appearances6
MedalsNone
FIBA World Cup
Appearances7
MedalsGold Gold: (2023)
Bronze Bronze: (2002)
EuroBasket
Appearances25
MedalsGold Gold: (1993)
Silver Silver: (2005)
Bronze Bronze: (2022)
Home jersey
Team colours
Home
Away jersey
Team colours
Away
First international
  Switzerland 25–18 Germany 
(Berlin, Germany; 7 August 1936)
Biggest win
 West Germany 127–53 Scotland 
(Osnabrück, West Germany; 11 May 1989)
Biggest defeat
 Yugoslavia 115–56 West Germany 
(Tbilisi, Soviet Union; 4 June 1965)

The Germany men's national basketball team (German: Deutsche Basketballnationalmannschaft or Die Mannschaft) represents Germany in international basketball competition. The team is directed by the German Basketball Federation (Deutscher Basketball Bund), the governing body for basketball in Germany. Currently, Germany is ranked third in the FIBA World Ranking.[2]

Between 1949 and 1990, separate German national teams were recognised by FIBA due to Allied occupation. The DBB were representing the Federal Republic of Germany (named West Germany from 1949 to 1990), while the East Germany team represented the German Democratic Republic (1952–1990). The two would later merge, after reunification in 1990.

Germany's greatest achievements to date have been competing in 25 appearances at the EuroBasket, winning gold in 1993, silver in 2005, and bronze in 2022. Germany have made seven appearances at the FIBA World Cup, winning gold in 2023, and bronze in 2002. At the Olympic Games, in Germany's six appearances, their top performances are three quarter-final finishes (1984, 1992, 2020).

History

Early years (1934–1939)

Germany became members of FIBA in 1934. After declining to enter the first ever EuroBasket in 1935, the national team would make their debut presence on the international stage at the 1936 Olympic Games as hosts in Berlin. It was also the first basketball tournament held at the Olympics.[3]

Entering the competition, Germany played their first match against Switzerland, which the team would lose 25–18.[4] The loss would send the team toward the consolation bracket to finish out the event. After the tournament, Germany failed to participate at the 1937 and 1939 editions of the EuroBasket, due to the continued rise of Nazi Germany during the late 1930s.

Post-war Germany (1946–1990)

Following World War II, along with Germany's involvement, the team was banned from participating in international competitions until 1950. The country was also split into West Germany and East Germany, after the end of Allied occupation in 1949. Also in 1949, in October of that year, the German Basketball Federation was founded. The East Germany national team eventually became members of FIBA in 1952.

At the end of their international suspension, West Germany entered the EuroBasket 1951 held in Paris. The team would open their stint at the tournament with two heavy losses, before earning their first ever victory in the competition against Scotland 25–69.[5] With a record of (1–2) after the preliminary phase, West Germany could not advance, and were sent into the classification phase. There, the team lost four out of their five matches, with their only win coming against Portugal 47–39.[6] West Germany would finish the event in 12th place in the then 18 team field.[7]

Two years later, West Germany made their second appearance at the tournament for EuroBasket 1953 in Moscow. The team would once again complete the preliminary phase at a record of (1–2), this time with their lone victory against Sweden 37–65.[8] Entering the classification rounds, West Germany would pick up two more wins, along with three more losses. At an overall record of (3–5), the team would finish out the competition in 14th place.[9]

After subpar performances in their first two appearances at the top continental tournament, West Germany would only reach the competition four times (1955, 1957, 1961, 1965) in their next nine attempts over 16 years. The best result for the national team during that period, would be their 13th-place finish at the event in 1957.[10]

West Germany made it back to the European Championship as hosts in 1971. The team ultimately went quietly at the event, as they were denied making it past the preliminary round once again. A year later, West Germany hosted the 1972 Olympic Games held in Munich. It was the second time the Olympic event was held on German soil. The team began the competition in Group B, where they would lose their first two matches, before defeating the Philippines 93–74.[11] West Germany, however, would only go (2–2) in their next four games of the group stage, before being relegated to the classification bracket. There, they would lose two more games before being eliminated.[12] After the Olympics, West Germany failed to qualify for a major international competition for the rest of the 1970s.

Nine years after West Germany played in their last international tournament, the team would qualify for the EuroBasket 1981. Although they would only prevail in one game in the group stage, a 66–51 win against Turkey; and having to close out their tournament appearance in the classification phase.[13] Two years later, the team made it back on to the continental stage at EuroBasket 1983. Led by a young core of players such as Detlef Schrempf, Uwe Blab and others, West Germany entered the competition placed in Group B. Behind posting a (2–2) record in their first four group stage matches, the team defeated Israel 77–70 in their final game of the round.[14] However, finishing in a second place tie with the Netherlands, prevented the team from advancing; due to their loss against them earlier in the tournament.[15]

In 1984, West Germany made their third appearance at the Olympic Games, after replacing the Soviet Union; who initiated a boycott on the event for political reasons. At the tournament, the team would make it to the quarter-finals of the competition for the first time, before succumbing to the eventual gold medalists United States (which featured a young Michael Jordan).[16]

Behind the encouraging performance by the team at the prior Olympics, West Germany as hosts of EuroBasket 1985, looked to build on the momentum. The first game was against the Netherlands, where the team completely dominated from start to finish in a 104–79 win.[17] At a record of (1–0), West Germany went on to split their next four games of the group stage to reach the quarter-finals. There, the team would come up short against Spain, to shift their focus to the classification rounds. West Germany won both of their matches in the phase, to complete a fifth-place finish at the event.[18]

The ensuing year, West Germany competed at the 1986 FIBA World Cup, after gaining qualification through a European qualifying tournament.[19] Making their first appearance at the competition, and without key players Detlef Schrempf and Uwe Blab due to NBA players being ineligible to participate in international competitions at the time, West Germany failed to make it out of the group stage.[20] In 1987, West Germany would enter their last event during the 1980s. At EuroBasket 1987, the team only managed to procure slightly better results, as they were eliminated in the quarter-finals.[21]

German reunification

After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989, and the reunification of Germany in 1990, a unified Germany national team qualified for its first tournament at the 1992 Olympic Games. With FIBA lifting their rule that prevented NBA players from competing in international competitions, veterans Detlef Schrempf and Uwe Blab were able to represent the national team for the first time since 1985.

Being placed in Group A at the competition, Germany earned their first victory against hosts Spain 83–74.[22] After barely escaping with a win in their second game versus Angola 63–64, the team were up against the juggernauts of the event to that point in the United States. However, Germany was heavily defeated by the famed "Dream Team" 111–68.[23] After the loss, the national team dropped their next two games of the group stage, but secured their spot into the quarter-finals. There, Germany lost against the Unified team representing the former Soviet Union 83–76, to finish out the tournament in the classification round.[24]

At EuroBasket 1993, Germany entered the tournament as hosts. After Detlef Schrempf retired from international competition following the prior Olympics, expectations for the team heading toward the event were tempered. However, Germany quickly impressed, as they made it all the way to the quarter-finals to defeat Spain 77–79 in overtime to reach the semis for the first time.[25] After a 76–73 win over Greece, the team was a win away from winning it all. In the final, Germany won their first European title 71–70 against Russia.[26] Additionally, the steady play by Christian Welp during the event earned himself MVP. Following Germany's triumph, the FIBA World Cup in 1994, and the next two editions of the EuroBasket (1995, 1997), saw the team fail to make it past the group stage.

The Nowitzki era (1999–2015)

Prior to Germany's arrival at the EuroBasket in 1999, the team selected 21 year old prodigy Dirk Nowitzki of the Dallas Mavericks to represent the senior national team for the first time. In their opening game of the tournament, Nowitzki led Germany with 21 points and 5 rebounds, to narrowly defeat Greece 59–58.[27] After a ten-point loss in their second game to Lithuania, the team got back on track with a 68–77 win versus the Czech Republic to enter the quarter-finals.[28] However, Germany would lose in the round to FR Yugoslavia 78–68, to finish the competition in the classification phase.

Dirk Nowitzki

After missing out on reaching the 2000 Olympics, Germany entered the EuroBasket 2001. First up for the team was Estonia, where Dirk Nowitzki poured in (33 points and 12 rebounds) to lead Germany to a 92–71 victory.[29] Following the win, Germany won two out of their next three games to advance. In the quarter-finals against France, Nowitzki's 32 points helped the team into the semis against Turkey. There, Germany's run at the event would come to a close, after losing a tough battle to the hosts 78–79.[30] With the bronze medal still attainable, even behind Nowitzki's tournament high (43 points and 15 rebounds), Germany was outlasted by the Pau Gasol led Spain 90–99.[31]

At the 2002 FIBA World Cup, Germany was placed into Group C to begin the competition. The first game for the team was a wire-to-wire victory over China 76–88, with Dirk Nowitzki leading the way once again with (30 points and 8 rebounds).[32] After the win, Germany would make it all the way to the quarter-finals with a rematch versus Spain, who they lost to in the bronze medal game at EuroBasket 2001. The team would ultimately prevail in a come-from-behind win 62–70, to reach the semis.[33] There, Germany came up short against Argentina 80–86, and having to play in the third place game. Germany went on to earn their first medal at the World Cup, by defeating New Zealand 94–117.[34] Moreover, national team star Dirk Nowitzki was named tournament MVP.

A year later, at EuroBasket 2003, Germany suffered its worst performance at the competition since the 1997 edition. The team failed to reach the knockout stage, and also missed out on the 2004 Olympics in the process, as the event was also a qualifier. After Germany stumbled through the EuroBasket in 2003, the team entered the tournament in 2005 with renewed ambition. Making it through the preliminary phase, and the playoff, the team was back into the quarter-finals once again. Germany would then display an all-around effort, with four players in double figures to eliminate Slovenia 62–76.[35] In the semi-finals, Dirk Nowitzki who played the entire 40 minutes, recording (27 points and 7 rebounds) willed Germany past Spain 73–74 into the final for the first time in 12 years.[36] However, the team would lose in the title game against the more experienced Greece 78–62. Even in defeat, the clutch play by Nowitzki throughout the competition got him the MVP award.[37][38]

Entering the 2006 FIBA World Cup, Germany won three out of their first four games, and were tied for second place in Group B with Angola. With one game left in the phase, which was against Angola, Dirk Nowitzki put up his personal tournament record of (47 points) in a 103–108 triple overtime win to secure second place.[39][40] Although after moving past Nigeria 78–77 in the Round of 16, the team would get eliminated in the quarter-finals by a Carmelo Anthony led United States 85–65.[41] At EuroBasket 2007, Germany once again made it through to the quarter-finals, but were embarrassed in the round by hosts Spain 83–55; and ousted from the tournament.[42]

During the 2008 Olympic Qualifying Tournament, Germany seized qualification to the 2008 Olympic Games, after grabbing the final spot by defeating Puerto Rico 82–96.[43] The team, however, exhibited no urgency after their opening victory in the competition against Angola. Germany would finish with a record of (1–4), and fail to make it out of the preliminary phase.[44] At EuroBasket 2009, and this time without Dirk Nowitzki, the national team continued their subpar play; and missed out on reaching the quarter-finals.[45]

For qualification to the 2010 FIBA World Cup, Germany gained entrance into the tournament by receiving a wild card. However, they were quickly eliminated from the event, after posting a (2–3) record in the group phase.[46] The following year, at EuroBasket 2011, Nowitzki rejoined the national team for the first time since the 2008 Olympics. Drawn in Group B to begin the competition, Germany displayed dominance in their first game against Israel 91–64.[47] The team would eventually pickup two more wins in the round to finish at (3–2), and advance toward the second group phase. There, Germany struggled, winning only one game versus Turkey to have their tournament end. After failing to qualify for the 2012 Olympics, Germany entered the EuroBasket 2013. Although without the services of an ageing Dirk Nowitzki, expectations for the team were limited. Placed in Group A, Germany started off the tournament with a surprise win over France 74–80.[48] However, after the brilliance demonstrated in the opening match, the team endured losses in three of their next four games in the round to be eliminated.

For EuroBasket 2015, Germany was named as one of four co-hosts for the event. With Dirk Nowitzki making a return to the team for the first time since 2011, there was hope he could once again help Germany for a deep run.[49] Drawn into Group B at the Euro finals, seen by many as the "Group of Death" entering the tournament, Germany prevailed in their first match against Iceland 71–65.[50][51] After the win, the team would have the misfortune of losing their last four matches of the preliminary round by seven points or less in each game to close out the event (1–4). Following the tough tournament for Germany, national team legend Dirk Nowitzki announced his retirement from international competition.[52]

Schröder takes over (2017–present)

Dennis Schröder in 2022

With the disappointment of the previous EuroBasket in the rear-view, Germany did come away from the competition with some positives. The team uncovered rising phenom point guard Dennis Schröder, who led Germany in scoring and assists at the event in 2015.[53]

During qualifying for the EuroBasket 2017, Germany put away Denmark in their first game 101–74, before their derby with Austria. Entering the match, the energetic Austria crowd helped their side hold the lead for majority of the contest, but Germany would make a final push in the fourth quarter to steal the away game 59–61.[54] After their resilient win in Austria, the team went on to garner a (4–2) record to secure qualification.[55]

At the tournament, Germany finished second in Group B with a (3–2) record, and advanced into the Round of 16. There, they defeated rivals France in a back-and-forth battle 84–81.[56] Although in their quarter-finals match, the team came up short against the eventual bronze medalist Spain 84–72. While Germany's run did not end the way they wanted, the immense efforts of Dennis Schröder stood out. He finished number two in scoring at the competition for the second consecutive EuroBasket.[57]

In

2019 FIBA World Cup, Germany opened up their World Cup qualifying campaign with a victory at home against Georgia 79–70.[58] Following the win, Germany swept through the first round of qualifiers at (6–0) to advance. During the second and final round, the team easily trounced Estonia 43–86 in the first game. Against Israel in game two, with a chance to clinch qualification to the World Cup with four games remaining, Germany rallied from 23 points down to eventually win in overtime 112–98.[59][60]

At the World Cup finals for the first time since 2010, Germany was drawn into Group F to begin the event. However, after two narrow loses to France and Dominican Republic, Germany easily defeated Jordan 96–62.[61] With a record of (1–2) in group play, the team could not advance, and were sent into the classification phase to finish out the competition.[62] Two years later, Germany went undefeated (4–0) during the Olympic Qualifying Tournament in Split, Croatia, to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics.[63] At the 2020 Olympic Games, which was delayed until 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Germany finished (1–2) in the preliminary phase. However, with the team being ranked as one of the best third-place finishers of the three groups, it was enough to advance. In the quarter-finals, Germany would progress no further, as they were eliminated in the round by Slovenia 86–70.[64]

Nowitzki's number 14 retired by the Germany national team.

At the EuroBasket 2022, Germany co-hosted the competition for the second time. With Dennis Schröder back in the fold for the national team, after missing out on the 2020 Olympics, Germany entered the event with high hopes. Prior to Germany's Group B opener against France, the German Basketball Federation held a ceremony to honour national team icon Dirk Nowitzki, where his number 14 jersey was officially retired.[65] After the conclusion of pre-game festivities, Germany would go on to capitalise on the emotions of the evening to win 63–76.[66] Following Germany's victory over Bosnia and Herzegivina in game two, the team prevailed in a tough double overtime battle versus Lithuania 107–109.[67] At a record of (3–0), the team would suffer their first defeat of the competition to Slovenia, before closing out the group stage with a win against Hungary.

After eliminating Montenegro in the Round of 16, Germany were up against Giannis Antetokounmpo and Greece in the quarter-finals. However, behind Germany's torrid shooting game, the team emphatically secured their place into the semi-finals for the first time in 17 years; with a 107–96 victory.[68] There, the team would come up short against the eventual champions Spain 91–96. Although with the bronze medal still in reach, Germany would defeat Poland 82–69, to finish the tournament.[69][70]

Germany after defeating the United States in the 2023 FIBA World Cup semi-final.

Following Germany's third-place finish at the Euros in 2022, the team went through European Qualifiers for the 2023 FIBA World Cup. Finishing with a (10–2) record during qualification, Germany confirmed their seventh World Cup appearance.[71][72] Entering the event, Germany was poised to not replicate the underwhelming performance they exhibited at the 2019 World Cup, as the team completed the preliminary phase of the competition at (3–0).[73]

Heading toward the second round, after heavily defeating Georgia 100–73 in the first game, Germany displayed dominance after a slow start to rout Luka Dončić and Slovenia 100–71.[74] Led by team captain Dennis Schröder's (24 points and 10 assists), Germany would advance into the quarter-finals.[75] There, Germany escaped a back and forth clash versus the surprise team of the tournament in Latvia 81–79.[76] At the semis, helped by the clutch performance of national team veteran Andreas Obst and his (24 points), Germany eliminated the United States 111–113; to reach the World Cup final for the first time in their history.[77] In the title game, in a tightly contested affair, Germany defeated Serbia 83–77 to become world champions.[78] After the event, the consistent play throughout the tournament from Dennis Schröder earned him the MVP award.[79]

Competitive record

Results and fixtures

  Win   Loss

2023

5 August 2023
Friendly
Germany  87–68  Sweden Bonn, Germany
19:00 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 18–16, 24–26, 18–19, 27–7
5 Boxscore Pts: Spires 13
Rebs: Clarance 6
Asts: four players 1
Arena: Telekom Dome
Attendance: 6,015
9 August 2023
Friendly
Germany  86–81  Canada Berlin, Germany
19:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 27–14, 23–20, 16–24, 20–23
18 Boxscore Pts: Dort 14 Arena:
Mercedes-Benz Arena

12 August 2023
DBB Supercup 2023
Germany  107–58  China Hamburg, Germany
18:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 25–12, 24–11, 32–18, 26–17
7 Boxscore Pts: Fu, Li Kaier 10
Rebs: Li Kaier 6
Asts: Zhao J. 6
Arena: Edel-optics.de Arena
Attendance: 3,400
13 August 2023
DBB Supercup 2023
Germany  112–1130(OT)  Canada Hamburg, Germany
18:30 CEST (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 26–20, 23–25, 38–33, 14–23Overtime: 11–12
8 Boxscore Pts: Barrett 31
Rebs: Gilgeous-Alexander 8
Asts: Gilgeous-Alexander 6
Arena: Edel-optics.de Arena
Attendance: 3,400
19 August 2023
Friendly
Greece  71–84  Germany Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
20:00 (UTC+4) Scoring by quarter: 14–20, 18–13, 23–31, 16–20
6 Boxscore Pts: Schröder, Theis 15
Rebs: Theis 7
Asts: Schröder 6
Arena: Etihad Arena
20 August 2023
Friendly
United States  99–91  Germany Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
20:00 (UTC+4) Scoring by quarter: 26–26, 20–28, 27–23, 26–14
: four players 3 Boxscore Pts: F. Wagner 17
Rebs: Theis 13
Asts: Schröder 10
Arena: Etihad Arena
25 August 2023 Germany  81–63  Japan
Okinawa City
, Japan
21:10 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 23–11, 30–20, 16–16, 12–16
5 Boxscore Pts: Watanabe 20
Rebs: Hawkinson 10
Asts: three players 3
Arena: Okinawa Arena
Attendance: 6,397
Referees: Omar Bermúdez (MEX), Amy Bonner (USA), Waseem Husainy (CAN)
27 August 2023 Australia  82–85  Germany
Okinawa City
, Japan
17:30 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 25–24, 19–25, 22–13, 16–23
6 Boxscore Pts: Schröder 30
Rebs: Voigtmann 6
Asts: Schröder 8
Arena: Okinawa Arena
Attendance: 6,205
Referees: Matthew Kallio (CAN), Blanca Burns (USA), Omar Bermúdez (MEX)
29 August 2023 Germany  101–75  Finland
Okinawa City
, Japan
16:30 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 19–22, 28–17, 29–16, 25–20
5 Boxscore Pts: Nkamhoua 14
Rebs: Jantunen 5
Asts: Maxhuni 6
Arena: Okinawa Arena
Attendance: 6,037
Referees: Matthew Kallio (CAN), Martin Horozov (BUL), Wael Mostafa (EGY)
1 September 2023 Germany  100–73  Georgia
Okinawa City
, Japan
17:30 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 22–16, 21–25, 27–16, 30–16
7 Boxscore Pts: Mamukelashvili 19
Rebs: Bitadze 6
Asts: McFadden 7
Arena: Okinawa Arena
Attendance: 5,852
Referees: Ademir Zurapović (BIH), Omar Bermúdez (MEX), Martin Horozov (BUL)
3 September 2023 Germany  100–71  Slovenia
Okinawa City
, Japan
20:10 (UTC+9) Scoring by quarter: 11–25, 27–9, 30–18, 32–19
10 Boxscore Pts: Dončić 23
Rebs: Dončić 6
Asts: Dončić 6
Arena: Okinawa Arena
Attendance: 6,634
Referees: Ademir Zurapović (BIH), Jorge Vázquez (PUR), Omar Bermúdez (MEX)
6 September 2023 Germany  81–79  Latvia Pasay, Philippines
16:45 (UTC+8) Scoring by quarter: 13–16, 23–18, 26–25, 19–20
4 Boxscore Pts: Žagars 24
Rebs: R. Kurucs 10
Asts: Žagars 8
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 7,584
Referees: Antonio Conde (ESP), Yohan Rosso (FRA), Martin Vulić (CRO)
8 September 2023 United States  111–113  Germany Pasay, Philippines
20:40 (UTC+8) Scoring by quarter: 31–33, 29–26, 24–35, 27–19
8 Boxscore Pts: Obst 24
Rebs: Theis, Voigtmann 7
Asts: Schröder 9
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 11,011
Referees: Antonio Conde (ESP), Boris Krejič (SVN), Gatis Saliņš (LAT)
10 September 2023 Germany  83–77  Serbia Pasay, Philippines
20:40 (UTC+8) Scoring by quarter: 23–26, 24–21, 22–10, 14–20
3 Boxscore Pts: Avramović 21
Rebs: N. Jović 8
Asts: Bogdanović 5
Arena: Mall of Asia Arena
Attendance: 12,022
Referees: Roberto Vázquez (PUR), Omar Bermúdez (MEX), Gatis Saliņš (LAT)

2024

22 February 2024 Germany  85–61  Montenegro Ludwigsburg, Germany
19:30 CET (UTC+1) Scoring by quarter: 28–10, 19–20, 11–20, 27–11
5 Boxscore Pts: Perry 16
Rebs: Nikolić 8
Asts: five players 1
Arena: MHPArena
Attendance: 4,141
Referees: Yohan Rosso (FRA), Paulo Marques (POR), Péter Praksch (HUN)
25 February 2024 Bulgaria  67–62  Germany Botevgrad, Bulgaria
17:00 EET (UTC+2) Scoring by quarter: 7–19, 21–8, 11–18, 28–17
Pts: Miller-McIntyre 23
Rebs: four players 5
Asts: Miller-McIntyre
4
Boxscore Pts: Da Silva 15
Rebs: Da Silva 12
Asts: Da Silva 4
Arena: Arena Botevgrad
Attendance: 4,500
Referees: Marius Ciulin (ROU), Martin Vulić (CRO), Vladimir Jevtović (SRB)
6 July 2024
Friendly
Germany  vs.  France Cologne, Germany
16:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Boxscore Arena: Lanxess Arena
8 July 2024
Friendly
France  vs.  Germany Montpellier, France
21:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Boxscore Arena: Sud de France Arena
13 July 2024
Friendly
Germany  vs.  Netherlands Hamburg, Germany
19:30 CEST (UTC+2)
Boxscore Arena: Barclays Arena
19 July 2024
Friendly
Germany  vs.  Japan Berlin, Germany
20:00 CEST (UTC+2)
Boxscore Arena: Uber Arena
22 July 2024
Friendly
United States  vs.  Germany London, England
20:00 BST (UTC+1)
Boxscore Arena: The O2 Arena
30 July 2024 TBD vs.  Germany Lille, France
21:00 CEST (UTC+2)
[Boxscore] Arena: Stade Pierre-Mauroy
22 November 2024 Sweden  vs.  Germany Sweden
Boxscore
25 November 2024 Germany  vs.  Sweden Germany
Boxscore

2025

20 February 2025 Montenegro  vs.  Germany Montenegro
Boxscore
23 February 2025 Germany  vs.  Bulgaria Germany
Boxscore

Team

Current roster

Roster for the EuroBasket 2025 Qualifiers matches on 22 and 25 February 2024 against Montenegro and Bulgaria.[80][81]

Germany men's national basketball team roster
Players Coaches
Pos. No. Name Age – Date of birth Height Club Ctr.
F/C 1 Oscar da Silva 25 – (1998-09-21)21 September 1998 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Barcelona Spain
G
3 Max DiLeo 30 – (1993-03-12)12 March 1993 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) Oldenburg Germany
G/F 6 Nick Weiler-Babb 28 – (1995-12-12)12 December 1995 1.96 m (6 ft 5 in) Bayern Munich Germany
PF
8 Jan Niklas Wimberg 28 – (1996-02-11)11 February 1996 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Bayern Munich Germany
C 10 Tim Schneider 26 – (1997-09-01)1 September 1997 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in) Alba Berlin Germany
PG 11 Nelson Weidemann 24 – (1999-03-25)25 March 1999 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) Bayern Munich Germany
SG 15 Jonas Mattisseck 24 – (2000-01-16)16 January 2000 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) Alba Berlin Germany
F
16 Louis Olinde 25 – (1998-03-19)19 March 1998 2.05 m (6 ft 9 in) Alba Berlin Germany
C 18 Jonas Wohlfarth-Bottermann 34 – (1990-02-20)20 February 1990 2.08 m (6 ft 10 in) Hamburg Germany
G/F 19 Lukas Wank 27 – (1997-01-19)19 January 1997 1.99 m (6 ft 6 in) Oldenburg Germany
SF 20 Malte Delow 22 – (2001-04-22)22 April 2001 1.97 m (6 ft 6 in) Alba Berlin Germany
PG 33 Bennet Hundt 25 – (1998-08-20)20 August 1998 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) Heidelberg Germany
PF
43 Christian Sengfelder 28 – (1995-02-28)28 February 1995 2.06 m (6 ft 9 in) Bonn Germany
G/F 44 David Krämer 27 – (1997-01-14)14 January 1997 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) Granada Spain
Head coach
Assistant coach(es)
Legend
  • (C) Team captain
  • Club – describes last
    club before the competition
  • Age – describes age
    on 22 February 2024

Depth chart

Pos. Starting 5 Bench 1 Bench 2
C Jonas Wohlfarth-Bottermann Jan Niklas Wimberg Tim Schneider
PF
Oscar da Silva Christian Sengfelder
SF Nick Weiler-Babb Louis Olinde Lukas Wank
SG David Krämer Malte Delow Max DiLeo
PG Jonas Mattisseck Nelson Weidemann Bennet Hundt

Head coach history

source[82]

Notable players

Dirk Nowitzki was a pillar for Germany throughout his career.

International influence

In Germany, professional basketball is known for developing players whose parents or grandparents are immigrants. The national team routinely uses many players who have family roots in Africa, Eastern Europe, United States or others, but have grown up in Germany and speak fluent German. Some examples are:

While most German players develop through the club system, several players over the years have played U.S. college basketball. Past and present national team players who have done so include:

Past rosters

As Germany

1936 Olympic Games: finished 17th among 21 teams

1 Bernhard Cuiper, 2 Robert Duis, 3 Karl Endres, 4 Emil Göing, 5 Otto Kuchenbecker, 6 Emil Lohbeck, 7 Hans Niclaus, 8 Kurt Oleska, 9 Siegfried Reischies, 10 Heinz Steinschulte (Coach: Hugo Murero)


As West Germany

1951 EuroBasket
: finished 12th among 17 teams

3 Kurt Siebenhaar, 4 Ulrich Konz, 5 Felix Diefenbach, 6 Wolfgang Heinker, 7 Rudi Hohner, 8 Rudolf Beyerlein, 9 Franz Kronberger, 10 Willi Leissler, 11 Markus Bernhard, 12 Gunter Piontek, 13 Oskar Roth, 14 Theodor Schober, 15 Harald Muller, 16 Arthur Stolz (Coach: Theo Clausen)


1953 EuroBasket
: finished 14th among 17 teams

3 Kurt Siebenhaar, 4 Theodor Schober, 5 Richard Mahrwald, 6 Gunter Piontek, 7 Friedrich Mahlo, 8 Hans Bayer, 10 Hartmut Kruger, 11 Oskar Roth, 12 Rolf Heinker, 13 Gerd Konzag, 14 Rudolf Beyerlein, 15 Richard Griese, 16 Markus Bernhard (Coach: Anton Kartak)


1955 EuroBasket
: finished 17th among 18 teams

4 K. Pfeiffer, 5 L. Waldowski, 6 R. Vogt, 7 Rudolf Beyerlein, 8 E. Friebel, 9 Kurt Siebenhaar, 10 Theodor Schober, 11 Oskar Roth, 12 Arthur Stolz, 13 U. Schmitt, 14 Harald Muller, 15 Richard Griese, 16 K. Brehm (Coach: Anton Kartak)


1957 EuroBasket
: finished 13th among 16 teams

3 Auxer, 4 Lamade, 5 Horst Stein, 6 R. Vogt, 7 Arthur Stolz, 8 Rigauer, 9 Gerhard Biller, 10 Ottmar, 11 Hans Brydniak, 12 Peter, 14 Klaus Schulz, 15 Richard Griese, 16 Scherer (Coach: Theodor Vychodil)


1961 EuroBasket
: finished 16th among 19 teams

4 Hans Gruttner, 5 Horst Stein, 6 Richard Pull, 7 Arthur Stolz, 8 Hannes Neumann, 9 Hans Brydniak, 10 Klaus Weinand, 11 Oskar Roth, 12 Gerhard Biller, 13 Volker Heindel, 14 Klaus Schulz, 15 Jürgen Langhoff (Coach: Branimir Volfer)


1965 EuroBasket
: finished 14th among 16 teams

4 Klaus Urmitzer, 5 Heinz Neef, 6 Hans-Dieter Niedlich, 7 Dietmar Kienast, 8 Hannes Neumann, 9 Bernd Roder, 10 Klaus Weinand, 11 Dieter Sarodnik, 12 Klaus Jungnickel, 13 Udo Wolfram, 14 Klaus Schulz, 15 Jorg Kruger (Coach: Yakovos Bilek)


1971 EuroBasket
: finished 9th among 12 teams

4 Helmut Uhlig, 5 Rolf Dieter, 6 Dieter Pfeiffer, 7 Jurgen Loibl, 8 Gerd Brand, 9 Rainer Pethran, 10 Jochen Pollex, 11 Klaus Urmitzer, 12 Holger Geschwindner, 13 Jürgen Wohlers, 14 Dietrich Keller, 15 Norbert Thimm (Coach: Theodor Schober)


1972 Olympic Games: finished 12th among 16 teams

4 Helmut Uhlig, 5 Klaus Weinand, 6 Dieter Kuprella, 7 Karl Ampt, 8 Hans-Jörg Krüger, 9 Rainer Pethran, 10 Jochen Pollex, 11 Joachim Linnemann, 12 Holger Geschwindner, 13 Jürgen Wohlers, 14 Dietrich Keller, 15 Norbert Thimm (Coach: Theodor Schober)


1981 EuroBasket
: finished 10th among 12 teams

4 Hans-Gunther Ludwig, 5 Joseph Waniek, 6 Sebastian Brunnert, 7 Matthias Strauss, 8 Jorg Heidrich, 9 Klaus Zander, 10 Michael Pappert, 11 Volkert Asshoff, 12 Holger Arpe, 13 Lutz Wadehn, 14 Armin Sowa, 15 Ingo Mendel (Coach: Terry Schofield)


1983 EuroBasket
: finished 8th among 12 teams

4 Christoph Körner, 5 Frank Hudson, 6 Uwe Brauer, 7 Matthias Strauss, 8 Ulrich Peters, 9 Klaus Zander, 10 Michael Pappert, 11 Armin Sowa, 12 Detlef Schrempf, 13 Uwe Blab, 14 Lutz Wadehn, 15 Gunther Behnke (Coach: Chris Lee)


1984 Olympic Games: finished 8th among 12 teams

4

Ralph Klein
)


1985 EuroBasket
: finished 5th among 12 teams

4

Ralph Klein
)


1986 FIBA World Cup: finished 13th among 24 teams

4 Ralf Risse, 5

Ralph Klein
)


1987 EuroBasket
: finished 6th among 12 teams

4

Ralph Klein
)


As Germany

1992 Olympic Games: finished 7th among 12 teams

4

Kai Nurnberger, 14 Jens Kujawa, 15 Michael Jackel (Coach: Svetislav Pešić
)


1993 EuroBasket
: finished 1st Gold among 16 teams

4 Moritz Kleine-Brockhoff, 5 Henrik Rödl, 6 Michael Koch, 7 Christian Welp (MVP), 8 Teoman Öztürk, 9 Henning Harnisch, 10 Gunther Behnke, 11 Stephan Baeck, 12 Hansi Gnad, 13 Kai Nürnberger, 14 Jens Kujawa, 15 Michael Jackel (Coach: Svetislav Pešić)


1994 FIBA World Cup: finished 12th among 16 teams

4

Kai Nurnberger, 11 Patrick King, 12 Detlef Musch, 13 Arndt Neuhaus, 14 Oliver Herkelmann, 15 Mike Knorr (Coach: Dirk Bauermann
)


1995 EuroBasket
: finished 11th among 14 teams

4 Ingo Freyer, 5 Henrik Rödl, 6 Michael Koch, 7 Detlef Musch, 8 Denis Wucherer, 9 Christian Welp, 10 Teoman Öztürk, 11 Patrick King, 12 Hansi Gnad, 13 Kai Nürnberger, 14 Ademola Okulaja, 15 Michael Knörr (Coach: Vladislav Lučić)


1997 EuroBasket
: finished 12th among 16 teams

4 Henrik Rödl, 5 Jörg Lütcke, 6 Gerrit Terdenge, 7 Vladimir Bogojević, 8 Denis Wucherer, 9 Henning Harnisch, 10 Sascha Hupmann, 11 Jürgen Malbeck, 12 Patrick Femerling, 13 Ademola Okulaja, 14 Tim Nees, 15 Alexander Kühl (Coach: Vladislav Lučić)


1999 EuroBasket
: finished 7th among 16 teams

4 Henrik Rödl, 5 Jörg Lütcke, 6 Kai Nürnberger, 7 Vladimir Bogojević, 8 Denis Wucherer, 9 Drazan Tomic, 10 Patrick Femerling, 11 Gerrit Terdenge, 12 Stephen Arigbabu, 13 Ademola Okulaja, 14 Tim Nees, 15 Dirk Nowitzki (Coach: Henrik Dettmann)


2001 EuroBasket
: finished 4th among 16 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Ademola Okulaja, 6 Robert Garrett, 7 Marko Pešić, 8 Stefano Garris, 9 Drazan Tomic, 10 Marvin Willoughby, 11 Stipo Papić, 12 Stephen Arigbabu, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki, 15 Shawn Bradley (Coach: Henrik Dettmann)


2002 FIBA World Cup: finished 3rd Bronze among 16 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Ademola Okulaja, 6 Jörg Lütcke, 7 Marko Pešić, 8 Pascal Roller, 9 Henrik Rödl, 10 Misan Haldin, 11 Stefano Garris, 12 Stephen Arigbabu, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki (MVP), 15 Robert Maras (Coach: Henrik Dettmann)


2003 EuroBasket
: finished 11th among 16 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Ademola Okulaja, 6 Jörg Lütcke, 7 Marko Pešić, 8 Sven Schultze, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Misan Haldin, 11 Stefano Garris, 12 Stephen Arigbabu, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki, 15 Robert Maras (Coach: Henrik Dettmann)


2005 EuroBasket
: finished 2nd Silver among 16 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Robert Garrett, 6 Demond Greene, 7 Marko Pešić, 8 Denis Wucherer, 9 Pascal Roller, 10 Misan Haldin, 11 Sven Schultze, 12 Stephen Arigbabu, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki (MVP), 15 Robert Maras (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2006 FIBA World Cup: finished 8th among 24 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Ademola Okulaja, 6 Sven Schultze, 7 Robert Garrett, 8 Johannes Herber, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Demond Greene, 11 Pascal Roller, 12 Guido Grünheid, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki, 15 Jan Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2007 EuroBasket
: finished 5th among 16 teams

4 Mithat Demirel, 5 Ademola Okulaja, 6 Stephen Arigbabu, 7 Robert Garrett, 8 Johannes Herber, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Demond Greene, 11 Pascal Roller, 12 Guido Grünheid, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki, 15 Jan Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2008 Olympic Games: finished 10th among 12 teams

4 Tim Ohlbrecht, 5 Philip Zwiener, 6 Sven Schultze, 7 Robert Garrett, 8 Konrad Wysocki, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Demond Greene, 11 Pascal Roller, 12 Chris Kaman, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Dirk Nowitzki, 15 Jan Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2009 EuroBasket
: finished 11th among 16 teams

4 Lucca Staiger, 5 Heiko Schaffartzik, 6 Sven Schultze, 7 Tim Ohlbrecht, 8 Konrad Wysocki, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Demond Greene, 11 Tibor Pleiß, 12 Elias Harris, 13 Patrick Femerling, 14 Robin Benzing, 15 Jan Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2010 FIBA World Cup: finished 17th among 24 teams

4 Lucca Staiger, 5 Heiko Schaffartzik, 6 Per Günther, 7 Tim Ohlbrecht, 8 Christopher McNaughton, 9 Steffen Hamann, 10 Demond Greene, 11 Tibor Pleiß, 12 Elias Harris, 13 Philipp Schwethelm, 14 Robin Benzing, 15 Jan Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann)


2011 EuroBasket
: finished 9th among 24 teams

4

Jan-Hendrik Jagla (Coach: Dirk Bauermann
)


2013 EuroBasket
: finished 17th among 24 teams

4 Alex King, 5 Niels Giffey, 6 Per Günther, 7 Philip Zwiener, 8 Heiko Schaffartzik (C), 9 Karsten Tadda, 10 Lucca Staiger, 11 Tibor Pleiß, 12 Robin Benzing, 13 Bastian Doreth, 14 Andreas Seiferth, 15 Maik Zirbes (Coach: Frank Menz)


2015 EuroBasket
: finished 18th among 24 teams

4 Maodo Lô, 5 Niels Giffey, 7 Alex King, 8 Heiko Schaffartzik (C), Karsten Tadda, 9 Tibor Pleiß, 12 Robin Benzing, 14 Dirk Nowitzki,
17 Dennis Schröder, 21 Paul Zipser, 25 Anton Gavel, 77 Johannes Voigtmann (Coach: Chris Fleming)


2017 EuroBasket
: finished 6th among 24 teams

4 Maodo Lô, 7 Johannes Voigtmann, 8 Lucca Staiger, 9 Karsten Tadda, 10 Daniel Theis, 12 Robin Benzing (C), 17 Dennis Schröder,
18 İsmet Akpınar, 22 Danilo Barthel, 32 Johannes Thiemann, 33 Patrick Heckmann, 55 Isaiah Hartenstein (Coach: Chris Fleming)


2019 FIBA World Cup: finished 18th among 32 teams

4 Maodo Lô, 5 Niels Giffey, 7 Johannes Voigtmann, 8 İsmet Akpınar, 10 Daniel Theis, 12 Robin Benzing (C), 17 Dennis Schröder,
21 Paul Zipser, 22 Danilo Barthel, 24 Maxi Kleber, 32 Johannes Thiemann, 42 Andreas Obst (Coach: Henrik Rödl)


2020 Olympic Games: finished 8th among 12 teams

0 Isaac Bonga, 1 Joshiko Saibou, 4 Maodo Lô, 5 Niels Giffey, 6 Jan Wimberg, 7 Johannes Voigtmann, 12 Robin Benzing (C),
13 Moritz Wagner, 19 Lukas Wank, 22 Danilo Barthel, 32 Johannes Thiemann, 42 Andreas Obst (Coach: Henrik Rödl)


2022 EuroBasket
: finished 3rd Bronze among 24 teams

4 Maodo Lô, 5 Niels Giffey, 6 Nick Weiler-Babb, 7 Johannes Voigtmann, 9 Franz Wagner, 10 Daniel Theis, 17 Dennis Schröder (C),
18 Jonas Wohlfarth-Bottermann, 21 Justus Hollatz, 32 Johannes Thiemann, 42 Andreas Obst, 43 Christian Sengfelder
(Coach: Gordon Herbert)


2023 FIBA World Cup: finished 1st Gold among 32 teams

0 Isaac Bonga, 4 Maodo Lô, 5 Niels Giffey, 7 Johannes Voigtmann, 9 Franz Wagner, 10 Daniel Theis, 13 Moritz Wagner,
17 Dennis Schröder (C) & (MVP), 21 Justus Hollatz, 32 Johannes Thiemann, 42 Andreas Obst, 44 David Krämer
(Coach: Gordon Herbert)

Media coverage

Germany's matches are currently televised by Deutsche Telekom.[83]

Kit supplier

Manufacturer

  • 2014–present: Peak

  • 2014–present:
    ING DiBa
  • 2022–present: TipWin

See also

References

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  2. ^ "FIBA World Ranking Presented by NIKE – Men". fiba.basketball.
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  9. ^ "EuroBasket 1953 tournament results". Archive.fiba.com. Retrieved 18 August 2014.
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  68. ^ "Germany's lights out show halts Giannis, Greece to reach Semi-Finals". Retrieved 13 September 2022.
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  75. ^ "Schröder takes this round of Dennis vs Dončić duel". Retrieved 3 September 2023.
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  82. ISSN 1614-9297
    .
  83. ^ "New FIBA agreement keeps Germany national team games on Magenta". Retrieved 8 February 2021.

External links