Löfven I cabinet

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
Stefan Löfven's first cabinet
Centre-left coalition minority government
with confidence & supply from the Left Party
Opposition partyAlliance: Moderate Party, Centre Party, Liberals, Christian Democrats
Sweden Democrats
History
Election(s)2014 election
PredecessorReinfeldt cabinet
SuccessorLöfven II cabinet

The first cabinet of Stefan Löfven (Swedish: regeringen Löfven I) was the cabinet of Sweden between 2014 and 2018. It was a coalition government, consisting of two parties: the Social Democrats and the Green Party. The cabinet was installed on 3 October 2014, following the 2014 general election. It lost a vote of no confidence following the 2018 election, but remained in office as a caretaker government. Löfven was reelected as Prime Minister in January 2019, thus forming the second cabinet of Stefan Löfven.[1]

With only 37.9% of the

Swedish history and relied on support from other parties in the Riksdag. At the 2018 election it became weaker, gaining only 32.6% of the votes. On 25 September 2018 the Riksdag passed a motion of no confidence in it by 204 votes to 142, and Löfven resigned. However, the speaker then invited him to stay on as acting prime minister of a caretaker government.[2]

2014 was the first time that the Green Party had been part of a government, and the first time in 57 years that the Social Democrats had formed a coalition cabinet. From then on, this was led by Prime Minister Stefan Löfven, leader of the Social Democrats. The cabinet consisted of 12 men and 12 women.[3]

The

cabinet ministers at 09:00 AM on the same day.[4][5][6][7][8]

In May 2016, Löfven reshuffled his cabinet. In July 2017, three cabinet ministers (Infrastructure Minister

vote of confidence by the opposition and a majority in the Riksdag.[9] Löfven subsequently removed Johansson and Ygeman from office, but retained Hultqvist, and the no-confidence motion against Hultqvist collapsed in September 2017 after the Centre Party and Liberals dropped their support for it.[10] The cabinet ruled out cooperation with the Sweden Democrats
.

Ministers

Portfolio Minister Took office Left office Party
Prime Minister's Office
Prime Minister3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Deputy Prime Minister[11]
(honorary title)
not a separate minister post
3 October 201425 May 2016 Green
25 May 201621 January 2019 Green
Minister for Strategic Development and Nordic Cooperation[12]
3 October 201425 May 2016 Social Democrats
Minister for Government Coordination
Minister for Energy
25 May 201621 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Justice[13]
Minister for Migration and Asylum Policy
3 October 201427 July 2017 Social Democrats
Minister for Justice
Minister for Interior
27 July 201721 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister of the Interior3 October 201427 July 2017 Social Democrats
Minister for Migration and Asylum Policy
Deputy Minister for Justice
27 July 201721 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry for Foreign Affairs[14]
Minister for Foreign Affairs
Deputy Prime Minister (Interim)
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for International Development Cooperation3 October 201425 May 2016 Green
Minister for the Climate
25 May 201621 January 2019 Green
Foreign Trade
25 May 201621 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Defence[15]
Minister for Defence
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Health and Social Affairs[16]
Minister for Social Security3 October 201427 July 2017 Social Democrats
Minister for Social Affairs
27 July 201721 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for Public Health, Healthcare and Sports3 October 201427 July 2017 Social Democrats
Minister for Children, the Elderly and Gender Equality3 October 20148 March 2018 Social Democrats
8 March 201821 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Finance[17]
Magdalena Andersson
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for Financial Markets
Minister for Consumer Affairs
Deputy Minister for Finance
3 October 201421 January 2019 Green
Minister for Public Administration3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Education and Research[18]
Minister for Education3 October 201421 January 2019 Green
Minister for Upper Secondary School and Adult Education and Training3 October 201413 August 2016 Social Democrats
13 September 201621 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for Higher Education and Research
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of the Environment[11]
Minister for the Climate and the Environment
3 October 201425 May 2016 Green
Minister for the Environment25 May 201621 January 2019 Green
Minister for Energy3 October 201425 May 2016 Social Democrats
Ministry of Enterprise[19]
Minister for Enterprise and Innovation
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for Digitalization
3 October 201418 April 2016 Green
Per Bolund (Interim)
18 April 201625 May 2016 Green
Minister for Digital Development
25 May 201621 January 2019 Green
Minister for Infrastructure3 October 201427 July 2017 Social Democrats
27 July 201721 January 2019 Social Democrats
Minister for Rural Affairs3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats
Ministry of Culture[20]
Minister for Culture and Democracy3 October 201421 January 2019 Green
Ministry of Employment[21]
Minister for Employment
3 October 201421 January 2019 Social Democrats


Facts and statistics

The numbers below refer to the composition of the cabinet at its formation on 3 October 2014.

Party breakdown

Party breakdown of cabinet ministers:

18
6

December 2014 budget crisis

On 3 December 2014, the proposed budget of the Löfven Cabinet

opposition Alliance's budget. Prime Minister Löfven announced plans to call for fresh elections in March 2015.[23] However, on 27 December, the early election was cancelled after the governing parties signed an agreement with the four parties in the opposition Alliance.[24] Under the "Decemberöverenskommelsen" (December Agreement), the six parties agreed not to vote against a budget proposed by the government for the next eight years. The December Agreement fell in October 2015 when the Christian Democrats decided to leave it.[25]

Policy

The government announced the outline of its policy on 3 October 2014. Plans included reducing unemployment to the lowest level in the EU by 2020, reducing deficits, phasing out nuclear energy, reducing emissions from fossil fuels and having a more socially liberal asylum policy.[26]

In its statement the government identified as feminist. It aims to increase gender equality, reduce the

gender wage gap and introduce quota if female representation on governing boards is below 40% by 2016. It also promised to increase penalties for aggravated sexual offences.[26]

The government's foreign policy will consist of pursuing membership of the

ISIL. It was the first EU government to recognise the State of Palestine in view to "facilitate a peace agreement by making the parties less unequal",[27] resulting in that Israel the same day recalled its ambassador for consultations.[28]

2018-19 government formation

Prime Minister Stefan Löfven lost the motion of no confidence against him and his cabinet on 25 September 2018. 142 members of parliament voted for retaining Löfven's cabinet while 204 voted against. Löfven stated in a subsequent press conference that he would not be stepping down as Social Democratic party leader and that he would be willing to partake in talks regarding the formation of a new government, but insisted that it is ultimately up to the Speaker of the Riksdag. Löfven also stated that he finds it "completely unbelievable that the Alliance could ever form a government", if they intend on keeping their promise of not co-operating with the right-wing Sweden Democrats. Löfven and his cabinet continued to serve as a caretaker government until Löfven was reelected as Prime Minister in January 2019, 131 days after the 2018 election. 115 MPs voted to re-elect Löfven as Prime Minister, while 153 voted against him and 77 MPs, representing the Centre Party, Liberals and the Left, abstained. Since the Swedish Prime Minister is elected through negative parliamentarism, a candidate can be elected to the office if no more than 175 MPs vote against him/her.[2][29][30][1]

References

  1. ^ a b "Stefan Löfven vald till ny statsminister – följ direkt". SVT Nyheter (in Swedish). 2019-01-18. Retrieved 2019-05-09.
  2. ^ a b Olsson, Hans (25 September 2018). "Stefan Löfven (S) leder övergångsregering". Dagens Nyheter. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  3. ^ "Sweden reveals new 'feminist' cabinet - The Local". Archived from the original on 2014-10-03.
  4. ^ "Löfvens nya regering - och de frågor den ska driva". Veckans Affärer (in Swedish). 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  5. ^ "Sveriges nya regering" (in Swedish). Regeringen. 3 October 2014. Archived from the original on 4 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  6. ^ Grönberg, Anna (3 October 2014). "Här är Löfvens regering" (in Swedish). SVT. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  7. ^ "Här är de nya ministrarna". Dagens Nyheter (in Swedish). 3 October 2014. Retrieved 3 October 2014.
  8. ^ "Sveriges nya regering (Sweden's new government)" (in Swedish). Swedish government. 3 October 2014. Archived from the original on 4 October 2014. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  9. ^ "The Alliance: We will put forward a vote of confidence against three ministers". Svenska Dagbladet (in Swedish). 26 July 2017. Retrieved 18 January 2021.
  10. ^ No-confidence motion against Sweden's Defence Minister collapses as two opposition parties back out, The Local (September 14, 2017).
  11. ^ a b "Contact the Ministry of the Environment". Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  12. ^ "Prime Minister's Office". Archived from the original on 26 October 2012. Retrieved 13 October 2014.
  13. ^ "Contact the Ministry of Justice". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  14. ^ "Margot Wallström and Isabella Lövin welcomed to the Ministry". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  15. ^ "Ministry of Defence". Archived from the original on 6 October 2014. Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  16. ^ "Ministry of Health and Social Affairs". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  17. ^ "Ministry of Finance". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  18. ^ "Contact the Ministry of Education and Research". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  19. ^ "Ministry of Enterprise". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  20. ^ "Contact the Ministry of Culture". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  21. ^ "Contact the Ministry of Employment". Retrieved 5 October 2014.
  22. ^ a b c d e f g Kerpner, Joachim, "Fakta om regeringen", Aftonbladet, retrieved 5 October 2014
  23. ^ The Local: Sweden's Prime Minister calls fresh election
  24. ^ "Sparar över 100 miljoner kronor". Aftonbladet.se. Retrieved 27 December 2014.
  25. ^ Forsberg, Oskar (9 October 2015). "Kinberg Batra: "Överenskommelsen är upphävd"". Aftonbladet. Retrieved 23 October 2015.
  26. ^ a b Prime Minister's Office, "Statement of Government Policy 3 October 2014". 8 October 2014. Retrieved 29 October 2014.
  27. ^ Margot Wallström, Minister for Foreign Affairs (30 October 2014). "Sweden today decides to recognise the State of Palestine". Dagens Nyheter. Retrieved 30 October 2014.
  28. ^ Israel recalls ambassador to Stockholm after Sweden's decision to recognize Palestinian state, Jerusalem Post 30 October 2014
  29. ^ "Stefan Löfven faller - röstade bort ur riksdagen". Expressen. 25 September 2018.
  30. ^ Kudo, Per. ""Jag vill fortsätta tjäna vårt land som statsminister"". Svenska Dagbladet (in Swedish). Retrieved 2018-09-25.
Preceded by
Reinfeldt
Cabinet of Sweden

2014–2019
Succeeded by
Löfven II